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Re-Examining The Effectiveness Of Stabilisation Policy

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  • ANTHONY J. MAKIN

Abstract

This paper develops an alternative international macroeconomic model for evaluating the effectiveness of fiscal and monetary policy in stabilising national income under fixed and floating exchange rates. It encompasses national output and income, saving, investment, money and capital flows and linkages between the exchange rate, price levels and real interest rates consistent with international parity conditions. It demonstrates that the nature of government spending is pivotal to the effectiveness of fiscal policy, revealing that, ceteris paribus, higher public consumption expenditure contracts national income and depreciates the exchange rate, whereas higher productive public investment spending has opposite effects. The framework also shows that the effectiveness of fiscal and monetary policy as macroeconomic policy instruments is not ultimately dependent on the exchange rate regime. Copyright 2007 The Author Journal compilation 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/ University of Adelaide and Flinders University .

Suggested Citation

  • Anthony J. Makin, 2007. "Re-Examining The Effectiveness Of Stabilisation Policy," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(4), pages 348-359, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecp:v:46:y:2007:i:4:p:348-359
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lane, Philip R., 2001. "The new open economy macroeconomics: a survey," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 235-266, August.
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    3. Barro, Robert J, 1989. "The Ricardian Approach to Budget Deficits," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 37-54, Spring.
    4. Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg & Michael M. Knetter, 1997. "Goods Prices and Exchange Rates: What Have We Learned?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1243-1272, September.
    5. Robert M. Solow, 1956. "A Contribution to the Theory of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(1), pages 65-94.
    6. Giancarlo Corsetti & Paolo Pesenti, 2001. "Welfare and Macroeconomic Interdependence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(2), pages 421-445.
    7. Anthony J. Makin, 2004. "The Current Account, Fiscal Policy, and Medium-Run Income Determination," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 22(3), pages 309-317, July.
    8. Dornbusch, Rudiger, 1976. "Expectations and Exchange Rate Dynamics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(6), pages 1161-1176, December.
    9. Taylor, Mark P, 1999. "Real Interest Rates and Macroeconomic Activity," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(2), pages 95-113, Summer.
    10. T. W. Swan, 1956. "ECONOMIC GROWTH and CAPITAL ACCUMULATION," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 32(2), pages 334-361, November.
    11. David H. Romer, 2000. "Keynesian Macroeconomics without the LM Curve," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 149-169, Spring.
    12. Tony Makin, 2006. "Has Foreign Capital Made us Richer?," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 13(3), pages 225-237.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ross Guest & Anthony J. Makin, 2011. "In the Long Run, the Multiplier is Dead: Lessons from a Simulation," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 18(1), pages 13-22.
    2. Brittle, Shane, 2009. "Ricardian Equivalence and the Efficacy of Fiscal Policy in Australia," Economics Working Papers wp09-10, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
    3. Tony Makin, 2012. "The Fiscal Policy Response to the Global Financial Crisis: A Critique," Chapters,in: Regulatory Failure and the Global Financial Crisis, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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