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Why Was the Consumer Feeling So Sad?

Author

Listed:
  • Michael C. Lovell

    (Wesleyan University)

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Michael C. Lovell, 1975. "Why Was the Consumer Feeling So Sad?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 6(2), pages 473-479.
  • Handle: RePEc:bin:bpeajo:v:6:y:1975:i:1975-2:p:473-479
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    File URL: https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/1975/06/1975b_bpea_lovell.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. C. Alan Garner, 2002. "Consumer confidence after September 11," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II.
    2. Georges Prat, 1996. "Le modèle d'évaluation des actions confronté aux anticipations des agents informés," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 47(1), pages 85-110.
    3. Roberto Golinelli & Giuseppe Parigi, 2003. "What is this thing called confidence? A comparative analysis of consumer confidence indices in eight major countries," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 484, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    4. Dion, David Pascal, 2006. "Does Consumer Confidence Forecast Household Spending? The Euro Area Case," MPRA Paper 911, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Kajal Lahiri & Yongchen Zhao, 2016. "Determinants of Consumer Sentiment Over Business Cycles: Evidence from the US Surveys of Consumers," Journal of Business Cycle Research, Springer;Centre for International Research on Economic Tendency Surveys (CIRET), vol. 12(2), pages 187-215, December.
    6. Victor Zarnowitz & Geoffrey H. Moore, 1977. "The Recession and Recovery of 1973-1976," NBER Chapters,in: Explorations in Economic Research, Volume 4, number 4, pages 1-87 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Arindam Mandal & Joseph McCollum, 2013. "Consumer Confidence and the Unemployment Rate in New York State: A Panel Study," New York Economic Review, New York State Economics Association (NYSEA), vol. 44(1), pages 3-19.
    8. Malgarini, Marco & Margani, Patrizia, 2005. "Psychology, consumer sentiment and household expenditures: a disaggregated analysis," MPRA Paper 42443, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Franco Modigliani, 1977. "The monetarist controversy; or, should we forsake stabilization policies?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Spr suppl, pages 27-46.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    macroeconomics; consumer sentiment;

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