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The Bank of Canada's Senior Loan Officer Survey




The Bank of Canada maintains regular contact with financial institutions as part of the information-gathering process that feeds into the larger set of information used to arrive at its monetary policy decision. Since 1999, the Bank has been conducting a quarterly survey of the business-lending practices of major Canadian financial institutions. Analysis of the information collected shows that it is correlated with future growth in both credit and business investment. This article focuses on how the survey is conducted and describes the construction of the summary statistics, highlighting the key statistical relationships in the historical survey data.

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  • Umar Faruqui & Paul Gilbert & Wendy Kei, 2008. "The Bank of Canada's Senior Loan Officer Survey," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2008(Autumn), pages 57-64.
  • Handle: RePEc:bca:bcarev:v:2008:y:2008:i:autumn08:p:57-64

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Macdonald, Ryan, 2007. "Canadian and U.S. Real Income Growth Pre and Post 2000: A Reversal of Fortunes," Economic Analysis (EA) Research Paper Series 2007048e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    2. Fagerberg, Jan, 2000. "Technological progress, structural change and productivity growth: a comparative study," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 393-411, December.
    3. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Gerard A. Pfann, 1996. "Adjustment Costs in Factor Demand," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(3), pages 1264-1292, September.
    4. Jeannine Bailliu & Michael R. King, 2005. "What Drives Movements in Exchange Rates?," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2005(Autumn), pages 27-39.
    5. Robert Lafrance & Lawrence L. Schembri, 2000. "The Exchange Rate, Productivity, and the Standard of Living," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 1999(Winter), pages 17-28.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pierre Siklos, 2014. "The Ill Wind that Blows from Europe: Implications for Canada's Economy," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 402, March.
    2. P. Siklos, B. Lavender, 2014. "The Credit Cycle And The Business Cycle In Canada And The U.S.: Two Solitudes," LCERPA Working Papers wm0065, Laurier Centre for Economic Research and Policy Analysis.

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