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Credit Derivatives




Credit derivatives are a useful tool for lenders who want to reduce their exposure to a particular borrower but are unwilling to sell their claims on that borrower. Without actually transferring ownership of the underlying assets, these contracts transfer risk from one counterparty to another. Commercial banks are the major participants in this growing market, using these transactions to diversify their portfolios of loans and other risky assets. The authors examine the size and workings of this relatively new market and discuss the potential of these transactions for distorting existing incentives for risk management and risk monitoring.

Suggested Citation

  • John Kiff & Ron Morrow, 2000. "Credit Derivatives," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2000(Autumn), pages 3-11.
  • Handle: RePEc:bca:bcarev:v:2000:y:2000:i:autumn00:p:3-11

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. George J. Benston & George G. Kaufman, 1998. "Deposit insurance reform in the FDIC Improvement Act: the experience to date," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q II, pages 2-20.
    2. Miller, Marcus & Zhang, Lei, 2000. "Sovereign Liquidity Crises: The Strategic Case for a Payments Standstill," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(460), pages 335-362, January.
    3. Cohen, Daniel, 2001. "The HIPC Initiative: True and False Promises," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(3), pages 363-380, Winter.
    4. Douglas W. Diamond & Philip H. Dybvig, 2000. "Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-23.
    5. Kenneth Rogoff, 1999. "International Institutions for Reducing Global Financial Instability," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(4), pages 21-42, Fall.
    6. Kydland, Finn E & Prescott, Edward C, 1977. "Rules Rather Than Discretion: The Inconsistency of Optimal Plans," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(3), pages 473-491, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jim Armstrong, 2003. "The Syndicated Loan Market: Developments in the North American Context," Staff Working Papers 03-15, Bank of Canada.
    2. Reszat, Beate, 2003. "How has the European Monetary Integration Process Contributed to Regional Financial Market Integration?," HWWA Discussion Papers 221, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
    3. Nicole Thorne Jenkins & Michael D. Kimbrough & Juan Wang, 2016. "The extent of informational efficiency in the credit default swap market: evidence from post-earnings announcement returns," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 46(4), pages 725-761, May.

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