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The influence of race, ethnicity, and individual socioeconomic factors on breast cancer stage at diagnosis

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  • Lantz, P.M.
  • Mujahid, M.
  • Schwartz, K.
  • Janz, N.K.
  • Fagerlin, A.
  • Salem, B.
  • Liu, L.
  • Deapen, D.
  • Katz, S.J.

Abstract

Objectives. Previous research has generally found that racial/ethnic differences in breast cancer stage at diagnosis attenuate when measures of socioeconomic status are included in the analysis, although most previous research measured socioeconomic status at the contextual level. This study investigated the relation between race/ethnicity, individual socioeconomic status, and breast cancer stage at diagnosis. Methods. Women with stage 0 to III breast cancer were identified from population-based data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results tumor registries in the Detroit and Los Angeles metropolitan areas. These data were combined with data from a mailed survey in a sample of White, Black, and Hispanic women (n = 1700). Logistic regression identified factors associated with early-stage diagnosis. Results. Black and Hispanic women were less likely to be diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer than were White women (P

Suggested Citation

  • Lantz, P.M. & Mujahid, M. & Schwartz, K. & Janz, N.K. & Fagerlin, A. & Salem, B. & Liu, L. & Deapen, D. & Katz, S.J., 2006. "The influence of race, ethnicity, and individual socioeconomic factors on breast cancer stage at diagnosis," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 96(12), pages 2173-2178.
  • Handle: RePEc:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2005.072132_1
    DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2005.072132
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2105/AJPH.2005.072132
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas C. Buchmueller & Léontine Goldzahl, 2018. "The effect of organized breast cancer screening on mammography use: Evidence from France," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(12), pages 1963-1980, December.
    2. Anezaki, Hisataka & Hashimoto, Hideki, 2018. "Time cost of child rearing and its effect on women's uptake of free health checkups in Japan," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 205(C), pages 1-7.
    3. Thomas C. Buchmueller & Léontine Goldzahl, 2018. "The Effect of Organized Breast Cancer Screening on Mammography Use: Evidence from France," NBER Working Papers 24316, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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