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Biofuels: Potential Production Capacity, Effects on Grain and Livestock Sectors, and Implications for Food Prices and Consumers

  • Hayes, Dermot J.
  • Babcock, Bruce A.
  • Fabiosa, Jacinto F.
  • Tokgoz, Simla
  • Elobeid, Amani E.
  • Yu, Tun-Hsiang (Edward)
  • Dong, Fengxia
  • Hart, Chad E.
  • Chavez, Eddie C.
  • Pan, Suwen
  • Carriquiry, Miguel A.
  • Dumortier, Jerome

We examined four evolution paths of the biofuel sector using a partial equilibrium world agricultural sector model in CARD that includes the new RFS in the 2007 EISA, a two-way relationship between fossil energy and biofuel markets, and a new trend toward corn oil extraction in ethanol plants. At one extreme, one scenario eliminates all support to the biofuel sector when the energy price is low, while the other extreme assumes no distribution bottleneck in ethanol demand growth when the energy price is high. The third scenario considers a pure market force driving ethanol demand growth because of the high energy price, while the last is a policy-induced shock with removal of the biofuel tax credit when the energy price is high. Standard results hold where the biofuel sector expands with higher energy price, raising the prices of most agricultural commodities through demand side adjustment channels for primary feedstocks and supply side adjustment channels for substitute crops and livestock. On the other hand, the biofuel sector shrinks coupled with opposite impacts on agricultural commodities with the removal of all support including the tax credit. Also, we find that given distribution bottlenecks, cellulosic ethanol crowds marketing channels resulting in a corn-based ethanol price that is discounted. The blenders’ credit and consumption mandates provide a price floor for ethanol and for corn. Finally, the tight linkage between the energy and agricultural sectors resulting from the expanding biofuel sector may raise the possibility of spillover effects of OPEC’s market power on the agricultural sector.

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Article provided by Southern Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 41 (2009)
Issue (Month): 02 (August)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:53093
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.saea.org/jaae/jaae.htm

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  1. Simla Tokgoz & Amani Elobeid & Jacinto F. Fabiosa & Dermot J. Hayes & Bruce A. Babcock & Tun-Hsiang (Edward) Yu & Fengxia Dong & Chad E. Hart & John C. Beghin, 2007. "Emerging Biofuels: Outlook of Effects on U.S. Grain, Oilseed, and Livestock Markets," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 07-sr101, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
  2. Elobeid, Amani & Tokgoz, Simla & Hayes, Dermot J. & Babcock, Bruce A. & Hart, Chad E., 2007. "Long-Run Impact of Corn-Based Ethanol on the Grain, Oilseed, and Livestock Sectors: A Preliminary Assessment, The," Staff General Research Papers 12717, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  3. Searchinger, Timothy & Heimlich, Ralph & Houghton, R. A. & Dong, Fengxia & Elobeid, Amani & Fabiosa, Jacinto F. & Tokgoz, Simla & Hayes, Dermot J. & Yu, Hun-Hsiang, 2008. "Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from Land-Use Change," Staff General Research Papers 12881, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  4. Du, Xiaodong & Hayes, Dermot J., 2009. "The impact of ethanol production on US and regional gasoline markets," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 3227-3234, August.
  5. Westhoff, Patrick C. & Thompson, Wyatt & Meyer, Seth D., 2008. "Biofuels: Impact of Selected Farm Bill Provisions and other Biofuel Policy Options," FAPRI-MU Report Series 37772, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute at University of Missouri.
  6. Thompson, Wyatt & Meyer, Seth D. & Westhoff, Patrick C., 2008. "Model of the US Ethanol Market," FAPRI-MU Report Series 37971, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute at University of Missouri.
  7. Simla Tokgoz & Amani Elobeid & Jacinto Fabiosa & Dermot J. Hayes & Bruce A. Babcock & Tun-Hsiang (Edward) Yu & Fengxia Dong & Chad E. Hart, 2008. "Bottlenecks, Drought, and Oil Price Spikes: Impact on U.S. Ethanol and Agricultural Sectors," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 30(4), pages 604-622.
  8. Kalaitzandonakes, Nicholas G. & Kaufman, James & Meyer, Seth D. & Thompson, Wyatt, 2008. "The Impact of Biotech Corn Traits on Ethanol Production," Environmental and Rural Development Impacts Conference, October 15-16, 2008, St. Louis, Missouri 53499, Farm Foundation, Transition to a Bio Economy Conferences.
  9. Du, Xiaodong & Hayes, Dermot J., 2008. "Impact of Ethanol Production on U.S. and Regional Gasoline Prices and On the Profitability of U.S. Oil Refinery Industry," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6353, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
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