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The Impact of Educational Fields on Fertility in Western Germany


  • Oppermann, Anja


Research on the impact of educational attainment on fertility behavior has been expanded by a new dimension – the field of education. This paper analyses how the educational field influences the transition to parenthood of women and men in Western Germany. The results show that educational fields matter for the transition to parenthood only for women. For men, the results do not show a significant impact of educational fields on the transition rates to parenthood. However, they point at the importance of the educational level for the probability of men to become fathers.

Suggested Citation

  • Oppermann, Anja, 2013. "The Impact of Educational Fields on Fertility in Western Germany," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 133(2), pages 287-297.
  • Handle: RePEc:aeq:aeqsjb:v133_y2013_i2_q2_p287-297

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality


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