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A Successful Accident: Recollections and Speculations about the CEA


  • Herbert Stein


As originally conceived, the President's Council of Economic Advisers would have a unique relation with the president, using Keynesian analysis to advise him on maintaining full employment. After fifty years, the Council has evolved into being a useful cog in a large decision-making apparatus, dealing with the whole range of federal problems of economic policy and bringing to bear whatever economics has to say. The initial Keynesian predisposition has faded. The Council has participated in some mistakes but it has made a valuable contribution, primarily by persistent representation of the value of the free market.

Suggested Citation

  • Herbert Stein, 1996. "A Successful Accident: Recollections and Speculations about the CEA," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(3), pages 3-21, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:10:y:1996:i:3:p:3-21 Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.10.3.3

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Maddison, David, 2003. "The amenity value of the climate: the household production function approach," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 155-175, May.
    2. Richard Tol, 2002. "Estimates of the Damage Costs of Climate Change. Part 1: Benchmark Estimates," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 21(1), pages 47-73, January.
    3. Richard S. J. Tol, 2009. "The Economic Effects of Climate Change," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(2), pages 29-51, Spring.
    4. Roberto Roson & Dominique Van der Mensbrugghe, 2012. "Climate change and economic growth: impacts and interactions," International Journal of Sustainable Economy, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 4(3), pages 270-285.
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    Cited by:

    1. Athanasios Orphanides, 2000. "Activist stabilization policy and inflation: the Taylor rule in the 1970s," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2000-13, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Athanasios Orphanides & John C. Williams, 2012. "Monetary Policy Mistakes and the Evolution of Inflation Expectations," NBER Chapters,in: The Great Inflation: The Rebirth of Modern Central Banking, pages 255-288 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Orphanides, Athanasios & Williams, John C., 2005. "The decline of activist stabilization policy: Natural rate misperceptions, learning, and expectations," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 29(11), pages 1927-1950, November.
    4. Athanasios Orphanides, 2012. "Commentary: the United States labor market: status quio pr a new normal?," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 453-462.
    5. Yasushi Iwamoto, 2005. "Interaction between Monetary and Fiscal Policy and the Policy Mix, Theoretical Consideration and Japanese Experience," CARF F-Series CARF-F-043, Center for Advanced Research in Finance, Faculty of Economics, The University of Tokyo.
    6. Bruno S. Frey, 2000. "Was Bewirkt die Volkswirtschaftslehre?," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 1(1), pages 5-33, February.
    7. Ulf Papenfuß & Tobias Thomas, 2007. "Eine Lanze für den Sachverständigenrat? Plädoyer für eine differenziertere Analyse wirtschaftswissenschaftlicher Beratungsinstitutionen," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 8(4), pages 335-358, November.
    8. Donihue, Michael & Kitchen, John, 1999. "The Troika process: Economic models and macroeconomic policy in the USA," MPRA Paper 22216, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Bonnen, James T. & Schweikhardt, David B., 1997. "Getting From Economic Analysis To Policy Advice," Staff Papers 11618, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    10. W. Robert Brazelton, 1997. "Retrospectives: The Economics of Leon Hirsch Keyserling," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(4), pages 189-197, Fall.

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    JEL classification:

    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General
    • N42 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - U.S.; Canada: 1913-


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