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Money, Income, and Causality: The U.K. Experience

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  • Williams, David
  • Goodhart, C A E
  • Gowland, D H

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  • Williams, David & Goodhart, C A E & Gowland, D H, 1976. "Money, Income, and Causality: The U.K. Experience," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(3), pages 417-423, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:66:y:1976:i:3:p:417-23
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kenneth Wolpin, 1975. "Education and Screening," NBER Working Papers 0102, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Layard, Richard & Psacharopoulos, George, 1974. "The Screening Hypothesis and the Returns to Education," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(5), pages 985-998, Sept./Oct.
    3. Spence, Michael, 1974. "Competitive and optimal responses to signals: An analysis of efficiency and distribution," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 296-332, March.
    4. Welch, Finis, 1975. "Human Capital Theory: Education, Discrimination, and Life Cycles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 63-73.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Shuping Shi & Stan Hurn & Peter C B Phillips, 2016. "Causal Change Detection in Possibly Integrated Systems: Revisiting the Money-Income Relationship," NCER Working Paper Series 113, National Centre for Econometric Research.
    2. Ansari, M. I., 1996. "Monetary vs. fiscal policy: Some evidence from vector autoregression for India," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, pages 677-698.
    3. Nelson, Edward, 2001. "What Does the UK's Monetary Policy and Inflation Experience Tell Us About the Transmission Mechanism?," CEPR Discussion Papers 3047, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Fazal Husain & Abdul Rashid, 2002. "ECONOMIC LIBERALIZATION AND THE CAUSAL RELATIONS AMONG MONEY, INCOME, AND PRICES: The case of Pakistan," Pakistan Journal of Applied Economics, Applied Economics Research Centre, pages 103-121.
    5. Anthony Cassese & James R. Lothian, 1983. "The Timing of Monetary and Price Changes and the International Transmission of Inflation," NBER Chapters,in: The International Transmission of Inflation, pages 58-82 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Mark Wheeler, 1991. "Causality in the United Kingdom: Results from an Open Economy," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 17(4), pages 439-449, Oct-Dec.
    7. Michael Marlow & Neela Manage, 1988. "Expenditures and receipts in state and local government finances: Reply," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 59(3), pages 287-290, December.

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