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The Challenge of Addressing Consumption Pollutants with Fiscal Policy

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  • Gregmar Galinato

    ()
    (School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University)

Abstract

We develop a theoretical model that elucidates the relationship between the quality of governance, composition of government spending and pollution as a by-product of the consumption process. We find that a shift in government spending towards goods that alleviate market failure increases income, which raises consumption pollution, but also increases environmental regulations, which decreases consumption pollution. Conditional on the government adopting a democratic regime, the effect through environmental regulations outweigh the effect through income leading to lower consumption pollution. We estimate an empirical model and find that the results support our theoretical predictions.

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File URL: http://faculty.ses.wsu.edu/WorkingPapers/Galinato/WP2014-1.pdf
File Function: First version, 2014
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University in its series Working Papers with number 2014-1.

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Length: 42 pages
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Handle: RePEc:wsu:wpaper:galinato-11

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Related research

Keywords: Government spending; public goods; consumption based pollution; democracy;

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References

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  1. López, Ramón & Palacios, Amparo, 2011. "Why Europe has become environmentally cleaner: Decomposing the roles of fiscal, trade and environmental policies," CEPR Discussion Papers 8551, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. McAusland, Carol, 2008. "Trade, politics, and the environment: Tailpipe vs. smokestack," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 52-71, January.
  3. Fredriksson, Per G. & List, John A. & Millimet, Daniel L., 2003. "Bureaucratic corruption, environmental policy and inbound US FDI: theory and evidence," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(7-8), pages 1407-1430, August.
  4. Bernauer, Thomas & Koubi, Vally, 2009. "Effects of political institutions on air quality," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(5), pages 1355-1365, March.
  5. Don Fullerton & Seung-Rae Kim, 2006. "Environmental Investment and Policy with Distortionary Taxes and Endogenous Growth," NBER Working Papers 12070, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. López, Ramón & Galinato, Gregmar I. & Islam, Asif, 2011. "Fiscal spending and the environment: Theory and empirics," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 180-198, September.
  7. Fredriksson, Per G. & Neumayer, Eric & Damania, Richard & Gates, Scott, 2005. "Environmentalism, democracy, and pollution control," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 343-365, March.
  8. Islam, Asif M. & López, Ramón E., 2013. "Government Spending and Air Pollution in the US," Working Papers 144406, University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
  9. Halkos, George E. & Paizanos, Epameinondas Α., 2013. "The effect of government expenditure on the environment:An empirical investigation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 48-56.
  10. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521855266 is not listed on IDEAS
  11. Lopez, Ramon & Galinato, Gregmar I., 2007. "Should governments stop subsidies to private goods? Evidence from rural Latin America," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(5-6), pages 1071-1094, June.
  12. B. Mak Arvin & Byron Lew, 2009. "Does democracy affect environmental quality in developing countries?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(9), pages 1151-1160.
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Cited by:
  1. Halkos, George & Paizanos, Epameinondas, 2014. "Exploring the effect of economic growth and government expenditure on the environment," MPRA Paper 56084, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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