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The impact of the American Civil War on city growth

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  • Maria Vera-Cabello

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  • Marcos Sanso-Navarro
  • Fernando Sanz
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    Abstract

    This paper analyzes the persistence of the shock caused by the American Civil War on the relative city size distribution of the United States. Our fi�ndings suggest that the effects of this shock were permanent, which sharply contrasts with previous results regarding World War II for Japanese and German cities. It should be taken into account that the conflict considered in this paper took place at an earlier stage of the industrialization and urbanization processes. Moreover, our results are determined by the fact that the battles were fought in the open �field, not in urban areas. Some related evidence regarding the presence of a safe harbour effect is reported.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa11p1514.

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    Date of creation: Sep 2011
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    Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa11p1514

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    1. Maarten Bosker & Steven Brakman & Harry Garretsen & Marc Schramm, 2005. "Looking for Multiple Equilibria when Geography Matters: German City Growth and the WWII Shock," CESifo Working Paper Series 1553, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Goldin, Claudia & Lewis, Frank D., 1978. "The Post-Bellum Recovery of the South and the Cost of the Civil War: Comment," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 38(02), pages 487-492, June.
    3. Steven Brakman & Harry Garretsen & Marc Schramm, 2004. "The strategic bombing of German cities during World War II and its impact on city growth," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(2), pages 201-218, April.
    4. Nitsch, Volker, 2003. "Does history matter for urban primacy? The case of Vienna," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 401-418, July.
    5. Marshall Burke & John Dykema & David Lobell & Edward Miguel & Shanker Satyanath, 2010. "Climate and Civil War: Is the Relationship Robust?," NBER Working Papers 16440, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Donald R. Davis & David E. Weinstein, 2002. "Bones, Bombs, and Break Points: The Geography of Economic Activity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1269-1289, December.
    7. Gunderson, Gerald, 1974. "The Origin of the American Civil War," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 34(04), pages 915-950, December.
    8. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "History and Industry Location: The Case of the Manufacturing Belt," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 80-83, May.
    9. Glaeser, Edward L. & Shapiro, Jesse M., 2002. "Cities and Warfare: The Impact of Terrorism on Urban Form," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 205-224, March.
    10. Lewis, Frank & Goldin, Claudia, 1975. "The Economic Cost of the American Civil War: Estimates and Implications," Scholarly Articles 2662305, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    11. Xavier Gabaix & Yannis M. Ioannides, 2003. "The Evolution of City Size Distributions," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0310, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
    12. Rose Adam Z. & Blomberg S. Brock, 2010. "Total Economic Consequences of Terrorist Attacks: Insights from 9/11," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 1-14, June.
    13. Vincenzo Verardi & Catherine Dehon & Marjorie Gassner, 2009. "Beware of "good" outliers and overoptimistic conclusions," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/9907, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
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