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Banking in Transition Countries

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  • John Bonin

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Wesleyan University)

  • Iftekhar Hasan

    ()
    (Fordham University, 5 Columbus Circle, 11-22, New York, NY 10019)

  • Paul Wachtel

    ()
    (Stern School of Business, New York University, New York NY 10012)

Abstract

Modern banking institutions were virtually non-existent in the planned economies of central Europe and the former Soviet Union. In the early transition period, banking sectors began to develop during several years of macroeconomic decline and turbulence accompanied by repeated bank crises. However, governments in many transition countries learned from these tumultuous experiences and eventually dealt successfully with the accumulated bad loans and lack of strong bank regulation. In addition, rapid progress in bank privatization and consolidation took place in the late 1990s and early 2000s, usually with the participation of foreign banks. By the mid 2000s the banking sectors in many transition countries were dominated by foreign owners and were able to provide a wide range of services. Credit growth resumed, sometimes too rapidly, particularly in the form of lending to households. The global financial crisis put transition banking to test. Countries that had expanded credit rapidly were vulnerable to the macroeconomic shock and there was considerable concern that foreign owners would reduce their funding to transition country subsidiaries. However, the banking sectors turned out to be resilient, a strong indication of the rapid progress in institutional development and regulatory capabilities in the transition countries.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Wesleyan University, Department of Economics in its series Wesleyan Economics Working Papers with number 2013-008.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2013
Date of revision:
Publication status: Forthcoming The Oxford Handbook of Banking 2nd edition
Handle: RePEc:wes:weswpa:2013-008

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Keywords: transition banking; bank privatization; foreign banks; bank regulation; credit growth;

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  1. Bonin, John P., 2004. "Banking in the Balkans: the structure of banking sectors in Southeast Europe," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 141-153, June.
  2. Paul Wachtel & Iftekhar Hasan & Mingming Zhou, 2007. "Institutional Development, Financial Deepening and Economic Growth: Evidence from China," Working Papers 07-17, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
  3. John P. Bonin & Iftekhar Hasan & Paul Wachtel, 2004. "Privatization Matters: Bank Efficiency in Transition Countries," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 2004-679, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  4. Bonin, John P. & Hasan, Iftekhar & Wachtel, Paul, 2004. "Bank performance, efficiency and ownership in transitition countries," BOFIT Discussion Papers 7/2004, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  5. Popov, Alexander & Udell, Gregory F., 2012. "Cross-border banking, credit access, and the financial crisis," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 147-161.
  6. Abarbanell, Jeffery S. & Meyendorff, Anna, 1997. "Bank Privatization in Post-Communist Russia: The Case of Zhilsotsbank," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 62-96, August.
  7. de Haas, Ralph & van Lelyveld, Iman, 2006. "Foreign banks and credit stability in Central and Eastern Europe. A panel data analysis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(7), pages 1927-1952, July.
  8. Haselmann, Rainer, 2006. "Strategies of foreign banks in transition economies," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 283-299, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Vlastimir Vukovic & Gradimir Ko┼żetinac & Dusan Kostic, 2009. "Impact of Global Financial Crisis on Banking Profitability: The Case of Serbia," Book Chapters, Institute of Economic Sciences.
  2. Claeys, Sophie & Hainz, Christa, 2006. "Foreign Banks in Eastern Europe: Mode of Entry and Effects on Bank Interest Rates," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 95, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
  3. Laura Cojocaru & Saul Hoffman & Jeffrey Miller, 2011. "Financial Development and Economic Growth in Transition Economies: Empirical Evidence from the CEE and CIS Countries," Working Papers 11-22, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.

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