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Are there lessons for africa from China's success against poverty ?

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  • Ravallion, Martin

Abstract

At the outset of China's reform period, the country had a far higher poverty rate than for Africa as a whole. Within five years that was no longer true. This paper tries to explain how China escaped from a situation in which extreme poverty persisted due to failed and unpopular policies. While acknowledging that Africa faces constraints that China did not, and that context matters, two lessons stand out. The first is the importance of productivity growth in smallholder agriculture, which will require both market-based incentives and public support. The second is the role played by strong leadership and a capable public administration at all levels of government.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 4463.

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Date of creation: 01 Jan 2008
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4463

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Keywords: Rural Poverty Reduction; Population Policies; Achieving Shared Growth; Services&Transfers to Poor;

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  1. Ravallion, Martin & Chen, Shaohua, 2007. "China's (uneven) progress against poverty," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 1-42, January.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Mthuli Ncube & Zuzana Brixiova & Zorobabel Bicaba, 2014. "Can Dreams Come True? Eliminating Extreme Poverty In Africa By 2030," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp1076, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  2. Hanjra, Munir A. & Ferede, Tadele & Gutta, Debel Gemechu, 2009. "Pathways to breaking the poverty trap in Ethiopia: Investments in agricultural water, education, and markets," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 96(11), pages 1596-1604, November.
  3. Muhammad Shahbaz & Ijaz Rehman & Nurul Mahdzan, 2014. "Linkages between income inequality, international remittances and economic growth in Pakistan," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 1511-1535, May.

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