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Banking in developing countries in the 1990s

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  • Hanson, James A.
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    Abstract

    During the 1990s commercial bank deposits and capital rose relative to GDP in the major developing countries. This rise largely reflected the dramatic fall in inflation of the 1990s and financial liberalization. But much of this growth in banks'loanable funds was absorbed by increased net holdings of central bank debt and of government debt. Much of the rise in government debt reflected post-crisis restructurings, notably in Brazil, Indonesia, and Mexico, but rising deficits also played a role. Bank intermediation between depositors and private sector borrowers remained limited in many countries despite financial liberalization. The post-crisis restructurings raise two important issues: the poor performance of loans that was revealed by the crisesand the future crowding-out that will result from the spreading-out of the cost of the crisis over time and the inability to retire the restructuring-related debt. The absorption of deposits in nonprivate sector credit, the growth of offshore finance of the private sector, and the poor performance of loans suggest a weakening of the link between the traditional measure of financial depth, M2/GDP, and economic growth and development. The changes in the 1990s also raise issues such as the potential for future deposit growth, the riskiness of bank portfolios, banks'increased dependence on government solvency, the access to credit for firms unable to access global markets, the foreign exchange exposure of countries, and the implications of the ongoing changes in regulation and supervision.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 3168.

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    Date of creation: 01 Nov 2003
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    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3168

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    Keywords: Financial Intermediation; Payment Systems&Infrastructure; Economic Theory&Research; Banks&Banking Reform; Financial Crisis Management&Restructuring; Banks&Banking Reform; Financial Intermediation; Economic Theory&Research; Financial Crisis Management&Restructuring; Financial Economics;

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    1. King, Robert G. & Levine, Ross, 1993. "Finance and growth : Schumpeter might be right," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1083, The World Bank.
    2. Levine, Ross & Loayza, Norman & Beck, Thorsten, 2000. "Financial intermediation and growth: Causality and causes," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 31-77, August.
    3. Beck, Thorsten & Levine, Ross & Loayza, Norman, 2000. "Finance and the sources of growth," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1-2), pages 261-300.
    4. Claessens, Stijn & Klingebiel, Daniela & Schmukler, Sergio L., 2002. "Explaining the migration of stocks from exchanges in emerging economies to international centers," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2816, The World Bank.
    5. Ross Levine & Sara Zervos, . "Stock markets, banks and economic growth ," CERF Discussion Paper Series 95-11, Economics and Finance Section, School of Social Sciences, Brunel University.
    6. repec:fth:wobaco:1083 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Honohan, Patrick & Shi, Anging, 2001. "Deposit dollarization and the financial sector in emerging economies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2748, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:
    1. Daniel, Betty C. & Jones, John Bailey, 2007. "Financial liberalization and banking crises in emerging economies," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 202-221, May.

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