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The public sector in the Caribbean : issues and reform options

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  • Swaroop, Vinaya
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    Abstract

    The public sector's performance in the Caribbean varies, in reducing poverty and in creating an enabling environment for growth. Barbados and the Bahamas have been the high performers, Guyana and the Dominican Republic have been sluggish, and the other Caribbean countries fall in between. In the Caribbean region, the public sector is now the predominant provider of tertiary education and health services (university education and hospital-based curative care), which mainly benefit the nonpoor. Attempts must be made to recover costs from high-income users and use that revenue to improve the quality and quantity (as appropriate) of basic services. Lessons from experience suggest that most Caribbean countries need to encourage the private sector to participate more in providing infrastructure and need to provide a better regulatory framework. The good news: this is already taking place in many countries.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 1609.

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    Date of creation: 31 May 1996
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    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:1609

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    Related research

    Keywords: Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Public Health Promotion; Public Sector Economics&Finance; Decentralization; Environmental Economics&Policies; Public Sector Economics&Finance; Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Poverty Assessment; National Governance; Inequality;

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    1. Psacharopoulos, George, 1994. "Returns to investment in education: A global update," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 22(9), pages 1325-1343, September.
    2. Behrman, Jere R & Birdsall, Nancy, 1983. "The Quality of Schooling: Quantity Alone is Misleading," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 73(5), pages 928-46, December.
    3. Hanushek, E.A. & Gomes-Neto, J.B. & Harbison, R.W., 1992. "Self-Financing Educational Investments: The Quality Imperative in Developing Countries," RCER Working Papers 319, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
    4. Devarajan, Shantayanan & Swaroop, Vinaya & Heng-fu, Zou, 1996. "The composition of public expenditure and economic growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 313-344, April.
    5. Eric A. Hanushek, . "Interpreting Recent Research on Schooling in Developing Countries," Wallis Working Papers, University of Rochester - Wallis Institute of Political Economy WP3, University of Rochester - Wallis Institute of Political Economy.
    6. Bidani, Benu & Ravallion, Martin, 1995. "Decomposing social indicators using distributional data," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1487, The World Bank.
    7. Robert J. Barro & Jong-Wha Lee, 1993. "Losers and Winners in Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 4341, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Antonio Estache, 1994. "World Development Report: Infrastructure for Development," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/44144, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
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    Cited by:
    1. Roland Craigwell & Danielle Bynoe & Shane Lowe, 2012. "The effectiveness of government expenditure on education and health care in the Caribbean," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 11(1), pages 4-18, April.
    2. Biswajit Maitra & C.K. Mukhopadhyay, 2012. "Public spending on education, health care and economic growth in selected countries of Asia and the Pacific," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 19(2), pages 19-48, December.

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