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Fighting against Malaria: Prevent wars while waiting for the "miraculous" vaccine

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    Abstract

    The World Health Organization estimates that 300 million clinical cases of malaria occur annually and observed that during the 80's and part of the 90's its incidence increased. In this paper we explore the influence of refugees from civil wars on the incidence of malaria in the refugee-receiving countries. Using civil wars as an instrumental variable we show that for each 1,000 refugees there are between 2,000 and 2,700 cases of malaria in the refugee receiving country. On average 13% of the cases of malaria reported by the WHO are caused by forced migration as a consequence of civil wars.

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    File URL: http://www.econ.upf.edu/docs/papers/downloads/766.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra in its series Economics Working Papers with number 766.

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    Date of creation: Sep 2001
    Date of revision: Jan 2006
    Handle: RePEc:upf:upfgen:766

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    Web page: http://www.econ.upf.edu/

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    Keywords: Civil wars; forced migration; economic impact;

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    1. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James Robinson, 2003. "Disease and Development in Historical Perspective," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(2-3), pages 397-405, 04/05.
    2. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2000. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," NBER Working Papers 7771, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Hoyt Bleakley, 2003. "Disease and Development: Evidence from the American South," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(2-3), pages 376-386, 04/05.
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    Cited by:
    1. Chen, Siyan & Loayza, Norman V. & Reynal-Querol, Marta, 2007. "The aftermath of civil war," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4190, The World Bank.

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