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Determinants Of Unionisation For Part-Time Women Employees In Australian Banks

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Abstract

Against the declining trend of Australian employees to join unions, unionisation of part-time female employees in the banking industry is relatively strong. For the finance and insurance industry in 2001, 30.3% of total part-time female employees were unionised compared to 25% of full-time female employees and 17.2% of full-time male employees. Overall, 22.3% of employees from this industry were members (ABS, 2002). Under freedom of association, what can influence an individual's decision to unionise? A survey was conducted on three major Australian banks in August 2000. We use a binary choice regression model to analyse personal and union-organising characteristics that significantly influence individual's decision to unionise. Previous membership under union preference provisions and earning relatively high wages would lead to a higher probability to join the union. Union's role in enterprise bargaining and whether union did anything to recruit have significant impact on individual decisions. Thus, part-time female employees are not unwilling to join when they recognise the need for job protection.

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Paper provided by School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia in its series Discussion Papers Series with number 317.

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Date of creation: 2002
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Handle: RePEc:qld:uq2004:317

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  1. Kenyon, Peter D & Lewis, Philip E T, 1992. "Trade Union Membership and the Accord," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(59), pages 325-45, December.
  2. Bob Mason & Peter Bain, 1993. "The determinants of trade union membership in Britain: A survey of the literature," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 46(2), pages 332-351, January.
  3. Hawke, Anne & Wooden, Mark, 1998. "The Changing Face of Australian Industrial Relations: A Survey," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 74(224), pages 74-88, March.
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