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Microinsurance: The Choice among Delivery and Regulatory Mechanisms

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  • Ahsan, Syed M
  • Mahmud, Minhaj

Abstract

We analyse the choice of the appropriate delivery mechanism(s) relevant to various types of microinsurance products in a developmental context like that prevailing in Bangladesh. By examining various delivery mechanisms under different institutional contexts, we analyse the conditions under which they operate best. Then we develop a few criteria that are likely to offer cost efficiency as well as customer acceptance, and judge between different schemes in light of these criteria, and dwell on the interface between the choice of the delivery model and the regulatory stance. Finally, we put forward a set of regulatory and supervisory directives that respect both product and process innovations and uphold the goals of cost efficiency, financial viability and client inclusivity.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/50286/
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 50286.

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Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision: Jul 2013
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:50286

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Keywords: Microinsurance; delivery and distribution modality; regulation and supervision;

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  1. Joel Sobel, 2002. "Can We Trust Social Capital?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(1), pages 139-154, March.
  2. Ahmed Mushfiq Mobarak & Mark R. Rosenzweig, 2013. "Informal Risk Sharing, Index Insurance, and Risk Taking in Developing Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 375-80, May.
  3. Syed Abdul Hammid & Jennifer Roberts & Paul Mosley, 2010. "Can Micro Health Insurance Reduce Poverty? Evidence from Bangladesh," Working Papers 2010001, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2010.
  4. Jalan, Jyotsna & Ravallion, Martin, 1997. "Are the poor less well-insured? Evidence on vulnerability to income risk in rural China," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1863, The World Bank.
  5. Seiro ITO & Hisaki KONO, 2010. "Why Is The Take-Up Of Microinsurance So Low? Evidence From A Health Insurance Scheme In India," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 48(1), pages 74-101.
  6. Rebecca L. Thornton & Laurel E. Hatt & Erica M. Field & Mursaleena Islam & Freddy Solís Diaz & Martha Azucena González, 2010. "Social security health insurance for the informal sector in Nicaragua: a randomized evaluation," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(S1), pages 181-206, September.
  7. Hongbin Cai & Yuyu Chen & Hanming Fang & Li-An Zhou, 2009. "Microinsurance, Trust and Economic Development: Evidence from a Randomized Natural Field Experiment," PIER Working Paper Archive 09-034, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  8. Tara Sinha & M. Kent Ranson & Falguni Patel & Anne Mills, 2007. "Why have the members gone? Explanations for dropout from a community-based insurance scheme," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(5), pages 653-665.
  9. Monique Cohen & Jennefer Sebstad, 2005. "Reducing vulnerability: the demand for microinsurance," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(3), pages 397-474.
  10. Craig Churchill, 2002. "Trying to understand the demand for microinsurance," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(3), pages 381-387.
  11. Dean Karlan & Ed Kutsoati & Margaret McMillan & Chris Udry, 2011. "Crop Price Indemnified Loans for Farmers: A Pilot Experiment in Rural Ghana," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 78(1), pages 37-55, 03.
  12. Michael J. McCord & Sylvia Osinde, 2005. "Reducing vulnerability: the supply of health microinsurance in East Africa," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(3), pages 327-381.
  13. Marc Maleika & Anne T. Kuriakose, 2008. "Microinsurance : Extending Pro-Poor Risk Management through the Social Fund Platform," World Bank Other Operational Studies 11136, The World Bank.
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