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Globalization, structural adjustment and african agriculture: analysis and evidence

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  • Bryceson, Deborah
  • Sarkar, Prabirjit
  • Fennell, Shailaja
  • Singh, Ajit

Abstract

A major purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of poor governance or ‘state fragility’ in African countries on their overall economic and agrarian performance. The results of our econometric analysis show that a higher level of public security is conducive to lower levels of conflict, whether of an ethnic, religious and regional nature. It also corresponds with greater agricultural value-added per capita. The analysis further indicates that trade openness and aid do not have a substantial impact on agricultural development. Our institutional and historical examination of the structural adjustment programmes in African countries suggest that African agriculture’s poor performance is not necessarily due to the negative influence of African governments, but could also, in large part, be attributed to the policies advocated by the international financial institutions and donor countries. The resolution of the problems associated with these policies lies in improving the ability of African farmers to benefit from new agrarian technologies that raise staple food productivity and thereby enhance food security and national stability. The paper also provides, inter alia, a nuanced analytical description, based upon available aggregate statistics, of the short and long-term performance of African economies and their agricultural sectors during the last 25 years.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/39045/
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 39045.

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Date of creation: Sep 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:39045

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Keywords: African agriculture; Poor governance; State fragility; Donor policies;

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  1. Round, Jeffery I., 2007. "Globalization, Growth, Inequality and Poverty in Africa: A Macroeconomic Perspective," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  2. Mkandawire, Thandika, 2001. "Thinking about Developmental States in Africa," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(3), pages 289-313, May.
  3. David Bailey & Helena Lenihan & Ajit Singh, 2009. "Lessons for African Economies from Irish and East Asian Industrial Policy," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 357-382, December.
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