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Teaching economics, appreciating spontaneous order, and economics as a public science

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  • Boettke, Peter

Abstract

James M. Buchanan has argued that the primary role that the economist plays in society is a pedagogical one. The job of the economists is to teach students the principles of economics, most notably an understanding of spontaneous order and the role of the price system in generating that order within the market. The didactic purpose is simply to teach students so they may in fact become informed participants within the democratic process of collective choice. It is in our job as teachers of the basic principles of economic science, and not as pure researchers, let alone as policy experts who act as saviors, that justifies the public expenditure on the discipline. Economics to Buchanan is a ‘prophylactic against popular fallacies’ and not a tool of social control.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 33064.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:33064

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Keywords: Pedagogy; Teaching Economics; History of Economic Thought;

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  1. Dani Rodrik, 2007. "Introductiion to One Economics, Many Recipes: Globalization, Institutions, and Economic Growth
    [One Economics, Many Recipes: Globalization, Institutions, and Economic Growth]
    ," Introductory Chapters, Princeton University Press.
  2. Peter Leeson & J. Subrick, 2006. "Robust political economy," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 107-111, June.
  3. Peter J. Boettke & Christopher J. Coyne & Peter T. Leeson, 2008. "Institutional Stickiness and the New Development Economics," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(2), pages 331-358, 04.
  4. Boettke, Peter, 2011. "Institutional transition and the problem of credible commitment," MPRA Paper 32089, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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Cited by:
  1. Richard Wagner, 2012. "Remembering Bill Niskanen: pursuing economics as a public science in the service of liberty," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 153(1), pages 1-7, October.
  2. Régis Servant, 2010. "La recherche de bonnes règles sociales: objet de science et de choix démocratique ? Le cas de Friedrich Hayek," Post-Print hal-00641440, HAL.

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