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How Do Female Spouses’ Political Interests Affect Male Spouses’ Views About a Women’s Issue?

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  • yamamura, Eiji

Abstract

This paper explored how the degree of female spouses’ political interest affects male spouses’ views about women’s empowerment, using individual level data in Japan. Controlling for unobserved city size and area-specific fixed effects, results showed that males were likely to consider women’s empowerment important if their spouses were interested in politics. This spouse effect was observed for conservative males but not for progressive ones. Results were unchanged when the endogeneity bias caused by spouses’ political interests were controlled for. These findings suggest that female family members’ political interests and views play an important role in determining male views regarding women’s issues.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/14837/
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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/17103/
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 14837.

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Date of creation: 24 Apr 2009
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:14837

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Keywords: Spouse; political opinion; women’s empowerment;

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  1. Goldin, Claudia, 1992. "Understanding the Gender Gap: An Economic History of American Women," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195072709.
  2. Marianne Bertrand & Erzo F. P. Luttmer & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2000. "Network Effects And Welfare Cultures," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(3), pages 1019-1055, August.
  3. Bruce Sacerdote, 2007. "How Large Are the Effects from Changes in Family Environment? A Study of Korean American Adoptees," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 122(1), pages 119-157, 02.
  4. John R. Lott & Jr. & Lawrence W. Kenny, 1999. "Did Women's Suffrage Change the Size and Scope of Government?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(6), pages 1163-1198, December.
  5. Patricia Funk & Christina Gathmann, 2008. "Gender gaps in policy making: Evidence from direct democracy in Switzerland," Economics Working Papers 1126, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  6. Abrams, Burton A & Settle, Russell F, 1999. " Women's Suffrage and the Growth of the Welfare State," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 100(3-4), pages 289-300, September.
  7. Daiji Kawaguchi & Junko Miyazaki, 2009. "Working mothers and sons’ preferences regarding female labor supply: direct evidence from stated preferences," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 115-130, January.
  8. Richard Cebula & Holly Meads, 2008. "An Inquiry into the Contemporary Differential between Female and Male Voter Turnouts," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 36(3), pages 301-313, September.
  9. Breyer, Friedrich & von der Schulenburg, J-Matthias Graf, 1990. " Family Ties and Social Security in a Democracy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 67(2), pages 155-67, November.
  10. Lena Edlund & Rohini Pande, 2002. "Why Have Women Become Left-Wing? The Political Gender Gap And The Decline In Marriage," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(3), pages 917-961, August.
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Cited by:
  1. Yamamura, Eiji, 2013. "Externality of young children on parents’ watching of anime: Evidence from Japanese micro data," MPRA Paper 46878, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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