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Bifurcations in Regional Migration Dynamics

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  • Berliant, Marcus
  • Kung, Fan-chin

Abstract

The tomahawk bifurcation is used by Fujita et al. (1999) in a model with two regions to explain the formation of a core-periphery urban pattern from an initial uniform distribution. Baldwin et al. (2003) show that the tomahawk bifurcation disappears when the two regions have an uneven population of immobile agricultural workers. Thus, the appearance of this type of bifurcation is the result of assumed exogenous model symmetry. We provide a general analysis in a regional model of the class of bifurcations that have crossing equilibrium loci, including the tomahawk bifurcation, by examining arbitrary smooth parameter paths in a higher dimensional parameter space. We find that, in a parameter space satisfying a mild rank condition, generically in all parameter paths this class of bifurcations does not appear. In other words, conclusions drawn from the use of this bifurcation to generate a core-periphery pattern are not robust. Generically, this class of bifurcations is a myth, an urban legend.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 13053.

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Date of creation: 28 Jan 2009
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:13053

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Keywords: Bifurcation; Genericity Analysis; Migration Dynamics;

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  1. Berliant, Marcus & Zenou, Yves, 2012. "Labor differentiation and agglomeration in general equilibrium," MPRA Paper 36207, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Krugman, Paul, 1980. "Scale Economies, Product Differentiation, and the Pattern of Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(5), pages 950-59, December.
  3. Puga, Diego, 1999. "The rise and fall of regional inequalities," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 303-334, February.
  4. Fujita, Masahisa & Thisse, Jacques-François, 1996. "Economics of Agglomeration," CEPR Discussion Papers 1344, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Kehoe, Timothy J, 1985. "Multiplicity of Equilibria and Comparative Statics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 100(1), pages 119-47, February.
  6. Dixit, Avinash K & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1977. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 297-308, June.
  7. Jorgen W. Weibull, 1997. "Evolutionary Game Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262731215, December.
  8. Anas, Alex & Arnott, Richard & Small, Kenneth A., 1997. "Urban Spatial Structure," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt835049q3, University of California Transportation Center.
  9. Zeng, Dao-Zhi, 2002. "Equilibrium stability for a migration model," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 123-138, January.
  10. Oyama, Daisuke, 2009. "History versus expectations in economic geography reconsidered," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 394-408, February.
  11. Abdel-Rahman, H. M., 1988. "Product differentiation, monopolistic competition and city size," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 69-86, February.
  12. Mas-Colell, Andreu & Whinston, Michael D. & Green, Jerry R., 1995. "Microeconomic Theory," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, number 9780195102680, October.
  13. Fujita, Masahisa & Mori, Tomoya, 1997. "Structural stability and evolution of urban systems," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4-5), pages 399-442, August.
  14. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-99, June.
  15. Masahisa Fujita & Paul Krugman & Anthony J. Venables, 2001. "The Spatial Economy: Cities, Regions, and International Trade," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262561476, December.
  16. T Tabuchi, 1986. "Existence and stability of city-size distribution in the gravity and logit models," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 18(10), pages 1375-1389, October.
  17. Rikard Forslid & Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano, 2003. "An analytically solvable core-periphery model," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(3), pages 229-240, July.
  18. Marcus Berliant & Fan- chin Kung, 2004. "The Indeterminacy of Equilibrium City Formation under Monopolistic Competition and Increasing Returns," Urban/Regional 0407011, EconWPA, revised 29 Apr 2005.
  19. DEBREU, Gérard, . "Economies with a finite set of equilibria," CORE Discussion Papers RP -67, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  20. Fujita, Masahisa & Krugman, Paul, 1995. "When is the economy monocentric?: von Thunen and Chamberlin unified," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 505-528, August.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Berliant, Marcus & Zenou, Yves, 2012. "Labor Differentiation and Agglomeration in General Equilibrium," CEPR Discussion Papers 8840, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Alexander V. Sidorov, 2011. "International Trade and Agglomeration in Asymmetric World: Core-Periphery Approach," DEGIT Conference Papers c016_020, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
  3. Oyama, Daisuke, 2006. "Agglomeration under Forward-Looking Expectations: Potentials and Global Stability," MPRA Paper 15239, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Leung, Charles Ka Yui & Teo, Wing Leong, 2011. "Should the optimal portfolio be region-specific? A multi-region model with monetary policy and asset price co-movements," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 293-304, May.
  5. Christian Ghiglino, 2011. "When Veblen meets Krugman," 2011 Meeting Papers 768, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Sidorov, A., 2013. "Stability of Totally Agglomerated Equilibrium in a Multiregional Core-Periphery Model," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 17(1), pages 44-62.
  7. Ikeda, Kiyohiro & Akamatsu, Takashi & Kono, Tatsuhito, 2012. "Spatial period-doubling agglomeration of a core–periphery model with a system of cities," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 754-778.

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