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Tendency of corruption and its determinants among public servants: A case study on Malaysia

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  • Duasa, Jarita

Abstract

This study attempts to analyze determinants of corruption tendency on a single country, namely Malaysia, using cross-sectional data. Using survey questions on sample of respondents in two states of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur and Selangor, data are collected and logit model is developed for estimation. The results from the regression on sample indicate that age negatively contributes to corruption tendency among government servants. The results also show that there are two departments, namely Police and Immigration departments, which have high probability of corruption and large spending, in particular, payments of personal debt, is positively contribute to high tendency of corruption among government servants.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 11562.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:11562

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Keywords: Tendency of corruption; public servants; Logit model;

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  1. Paolo Mauro, 1996. "The Effects of Corruptionon Growth, Investment, and Government Expenditure," IMF Working Papers 96/98, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Mo, Pak Hung, 2001. "Corruption and Economic Growth," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 66-79, March.
  3. Esther Hauk & Maria Sáez, 1999. "On the cultural transmission of corruption," Economics Working Papers 392, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  4. Rafael Di Tella & Alberto Ades, 1999. "Rents, Competition, and Corruption," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(4), pages 982-993, September.
  5. Shang-Jin Wei, 1997. "How Taxing is Corruption on International Investors?," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 63, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  6. Mauro, Paolo, 1995. "Corruption and Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(3), pages 681-712, August.
  7. Isaac Ehrlich & Francis T. Lui, 1999. "Bureaucratic Corruption and Endogenous Economic Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(S6), pages S270-S293, December.
  8. Ades, Alberto & Di Tella, Rafael, 1997. "National Champions and Corruption: Some Unpleasant Interventionist Arithmetic," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(443), pages 1023-42, July.
  9. Johann Graf Lambsdorff, 2003. "How Corruption Affects Productivity," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(4), pages 457-474, November.
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