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ICT-specific technological change and productivity growth in the US 1980-2004

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  • Diego Martínez López

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Universidad Pablo de Olavide)

  • Jesús Rodríguez López

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Universidad Pablo de Olavide)

  • José Luis Torres Chacón

    ()
    (Departamento de Teoría e Historia Económica, Universidad de Málaga)

Abstract

This paper studies the impact of the information and communication technologies (ICT) on U.S. economic growth using a dynamic general equilibrium approach. We use a production function with six different capital inputs, three of them corresponding to ICT assets and other three to non-ICT assets. We find that the technological change embedded in hardware equipment is the main leading non-neutral force of the U.S. productivity growth and accounts for about one quarter of it during the period 1980-2004. As a whole, ICT-specific technological change accounts for about 35% of total labor productivity growth.

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File URL: http://www.upo.es/serv/bib/wps/econ0805.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 08.05.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pab:wpaper:08.05

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Keywords: New economy; information and communication technologies; specific-technological change; neutral-technological change.;

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References

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  1. Enrique G. Mendoza & Assaf Razin & Linda L. Tesar, 1994. "Effective Tax Rates in Macroeconomics: Cross-Country Estimates of Tax Rates on Factor Incomes and Consumption," NBER Working Papers 4864, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  16. Marcel P. Timmer & Bart van Ark, 2005. "Does information and communication technology drive EU-US productivity growth differentials?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(4), pages 693-716, October.
  17. Ark, Bart van, 2002. "ICT investments and growth accounts for the European Union," GGDC Research Memorandum 200256, Groningen Growth and Development Centre, University of Groningen.
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  19. Bakhshi, Hasan & Larsen, Jens, 2005. "ICT-specific technological progress in the United Kingdom," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 648-669, December.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Vu, Khuong M., 2013. "Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Singapore’s economic growth," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 284-300.
  2. Jesus Lopez-Rodriguez & Diego Martinez, 2014. "Beyond the R&D effects on innovation: the contribution of non-R&D activities to TFP growth in the EU," Working Papers 2014/16, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  3. Keesookpuna, Chutipong & Mitomob, Hitoshi, 2011. "Examining the relationship of communication service utilisation and productivity of labour in the developing country: A case study of Thailand," 8th Asia-Pacific Regional ITS Conference, Taipei 2011: Convergence in the Digital Age 52329, International Telecommunications Society (ITS).
  4. Keesookpuna, Chutipong & Mitomob, Hitoshi, 2012. "A developmental framework for ICT and labour productivity in the developing country: A case study of Thailand," 23rd European Regional ITS Conference, Vienna 2012 60378, International Telecommunications Society (ITS).

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