Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Trade and the Pattern of European Imperialism, 1492-2000

Contents:

Author Info

  • Roberto Bonfatti

Abstract

I construct a trade model of empire, and use it to interpret some of the key patterns in the history of European imperialism.� I begin from the observation that trade was a key source of wealth for the colonies, and trade restrictions a key tool of extraction for colonial powers.� But the value of this tool must be seen in relation to the value of colonial trade, and to the extent of international competition for it.� The model interprets the colonial empires that emerged in the 16th-18th century as a set of political institutions designed to appropriate the value of colonial trade to the mother country, at a time in which colonial trade was both valuable and highly competed for.� It explains the fluctuations in the fortunes of empire in the 19th and early 20th century with the rise of a clear industrial leader, Britain, and her subsequent decline.� Finally, it attributes the fall of colonial empires to a secular fall in the importance of colonial trade, relative to trade between the industrial countries.� I provide detailed historical evidence in support of these predictions.� The model also has predictions for the impact of empire-building on trade relations between the imperial powers.� These are consistent with the apparent inverse relation between European imperial expansion and globalization.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/materials/papers/12115/paper618.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Oxford, Department of Economics in its series Economics Series Working Papers with number 618.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 09 Aug 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:618

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Manor Rd. Building, Oxford, OX1 3UQ
Email:
Web page: http://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Imperialism; Preferential trade agreements; Intra-industry trade; Hegemonic stability;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Kyle Bagwell & Robert W. Staiger, 1997. "An Economic Theory of GATT," NBER Working Papers 6049, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Guillaume Daudin & Kevin H O'Rourke & Leandro Prados De La Escosura, 2008. "Trade and Empire, 1700-1870," Sciences Po publications 2008-24, Sciences Po.
  3. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2008. "Globalization and the Great Divergence: Terms of Trade Booms and Volatility in the Poor Periphery 1782-1913," Working Papers 08-07, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
  4. Robert C. Allen, 2003. "Progress and poverty in early modern Europe," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 56(3), pages 403-443, 08.
  5. Emanuel Ornelas, 2005. "Rent Destruction and the Political Viability of Free Trade Agreements," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 120(4), pages 1475-1506, November.
  6. John Gallagher & Ronald Robinson, 1953. "The Imperialism Of Free Trade," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 6(1), pages 1-15, 08.
  7. Carlos, Ann M., 2003. "The Rise of Commercial Empires: England and the Netherlands in the Age of Mercantilism, 1650 1770. By David Ormond. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Pp. ix, 388. $75.00," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 63(04), pages 1154-1155, December.
  8. Krugman, Paul R, 1981. "Intraindustry Specialization and the Gains from Trade," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(5), pages 959-73, October.
  9. Garfinkel , Michelle & Skaperdas, Stergios & Syropoulos, Constantinos, 2012. "Trade and Insecure Resources: Implications for Welfare and Comparative Advantage," School of Economics Working Paper Series 2012-8, LeBow College of Business, Drexel University.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Roberto Bonfatti, 2012. "The Sustainability of Empire in Global Perspective: The Role of International Trade Patterns," CESifo Working Paper Series 3857, CESifo Group Munich.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:618. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Caroline Wise).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.