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What We Spend and What We Get: Public and Private Provision of Crime Prevention

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  • Ann Dryden Witte
  • Robert Witt

Abstract

In this paper, we consider a number of issues regarding crime prevention and criminal justice. We begin by considering how crime is measured and present both general and specific evidence on the level of crime in a variety of countries. Crime is pervasive and varies substantially across countries. We outline the arguments for some public roll in crime prevention, enforcement, prosecution, defence, and adjudication. We consider the relative role of the public and private sectors in crime control and criminal justice. We discuss various measures for the effectiveness of the criminal justice system. We conclude by suggesting some potential areas for research.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 8204.

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Date of creation: Apr 2001
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Publication status: published as Witte, Anne Dryden and Robert Witt. “What We Spend and What We Get: Crime and Criminal Justice, a Multinational Examination.” Fiscal Studies 22, 1 (March 2001): 1-40.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:8204

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Cited by:
  1. Cormac O'Dea & Ian Preston, 2012. "The distributional impact of public spending in the UK," IFS Working Papers W12/06, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

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