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End-stage Renal Disease and Economic Incentives: The International Study of Health Care Organization and Financing

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  • Avi Dor
  • Mark V. Pauly
  • Margaret A. Eichleay
  • Philip J. Held
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    Abstract

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD), or kidney failure, is a debilitating, costly, and increasingly common medical condition. Little is known about how different financing approaches affect ESRD outcomes and delivery of care. This paper presents results from a comparative review of 12 countries with alternative models of incentives and benefits, collected under the International Study of Health Care Organization and Financing, a substudy within the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study. Variation in spending per ESRD patient is relatively small and is correlated with overall per capita health care spending. Between-country variations in spending are reduced using an input price parity index constructed for this study. Remaining differences in costs and outcomes do not seem strongly linked to differences in incentives embedded in national programs.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 13125.

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    Date of creation: May 2007
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    Publication status: published as Avi Dor & Mark Pauly & Margaret Eichleay & Philip Held, 2007. "End-stage renal disease and economic incentives: the International Study of Health Care Organization and Financing (ISHCOF)," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 73-111, September.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13125

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    1. Chalkley, M. & Malcomson, J.M., 1995. "Contracting for health services with unmonitored quality," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 9510, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    2. José Luño, 2007. "The organization and financing of end-stage renal disease in Spain," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 253-267, December.
    3. Ellis, Randall P. & McGuire, Thomas G., 1996. "Hospital response to prospective payment: Moral hazard, selection, and practice-style effects," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 257-277, June.
    4. John F.P. Bridges & Avi Dor & Michael Grossman, 2005. "A Wolf Dressed in Sheep's Clothing: Perhaps Quality Measures are Just Unmeasured Severity," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer Healthcare | Adis, vol. 4(1), pages 55-64.
    5. Held, Philip J. & Pauly, Mark V., 1983. "Competition and efficiency in the end stage renal disease program," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 95-118, August.
    6. Sarah Wordsworth & Anne Ludbrook, 2005. "Comparing costing results in across country economic evaluations: the use of technology specific purchasing power parities," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(1), pages 93-99.
    7. Anthony Harris, 2007. "The organization and funding of the treatment of end-stage renal disease in Australia," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 113-132, September.
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    Cited by:
    1. Braden Manns & David Mendelssohn & Kenneth Taub, 2007. "The economics of end-stage renal disease care in Canada: incentives and impact on delivery of care," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 149-169, September.
    2. Tricia Nicholson & Paul Roderick, 2007. "International Study of Health Care Organization and Financing of renal services in England and Wales," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 283-299, December.
    3. Werner Kleophas & Helmut Reichel, 2007. "International study of health care organization and financing: development of renal replacement therapy in Germany," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 185-200, September.
    4. Anthony Harris, 2007. "The organization and funding of the treatment of end-stage renal disease in Australia," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 113-132, September.
    5. Giuseppe Pontoriero & Pietro Pozzoni & Lucia Vecchio & Francesco Locatelli, 2007. "International Study of Health Care Organization and Financing for renal replacement therapy in Italy: an evolving reality," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 201-215, September.
    6. José Luño, 2007. "The organization and financing of end-stage renal disease in Spain," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 253-267, December.
    7. Alan M. Garber & Jonathan Skinner, 2008. "Is American Health Care Uniquely Inefficient?," NBER Working Papers 14257, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Shunichi Fukuhara & Chikao Yamazaki & Yasuaki Hayashino & Takahiro Higashi & Margaret Eichleay & Takashi Akiba & Tadao Akizawa & Akira Saito & Friedrich Port & Kiyoshi Kurokawa, 2007. "The organization and financing of end-stage renal disease treatment in Japan," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 217-231, September.
    9. Toni Ashton & Mark Marshall, 2007. "The organization and financing of dialysis and kidney transplantation services in New Zealand," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 233-252, December.

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