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When does a developing country use new technologies ?

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  • Olivier Bruno

    ()
    (GREDEG)

  • Cuong Le Van

    ()
    (CERMSEM)

  • Benoît Masquin

    ()
    (GREDEG)

Abstract

We develop a model of optimal pattern of economic development that is first rooted in physical capital accumulation and then in technical progress. We study an economy where capital accumulation and innovative activity take place within a two sector model. The first sector produces a consumption good using physical capital and non skilled labor. Technological progress in the consumption sector is driven by the research activity that takes place in the second sector. Research activity which produces new technologies requires technological capital and skilled labor. New technologies induce and endogenous increase of the Total Factor Productivity of the consumption sector. Physical and technological capital are not substitutable while skilled and non skilled labor may be substitutable. We show that under conditions on the adoption process of new technologies, the optimal strategy for a developing country consist in accumulating physical capital first ; postponing the importation of technological capital to the second stage of development. This result is due to a threshold effect from which new technologies begin to have an impact on the productivity of the consumption sector. However, we show that once a certain level of wealth is reached, it becomes optimal for the economy to import technological capital to produce new technologies.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1) in its series Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences Economiques with number b05093.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mse:wpsorb:b05093

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Keywords: New technology; economic development; developing country; optimal growth.;

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Cited by:
  1. Cuong Le Van & Tu-Anh Nguyen & Manh-Hung Nguyen & Thai Bao Luong, 2007. "New Technology, Human Capital and Growth for Developing Countries," Working Papers 01, Development and Policies Research Center (DEPOCEN), Vietnam, revised Jan 2009.
  2. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00118979 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Cuong Le Van & Manh-Hung Nguyen & Thai Bao Luong & Tu Anh Nguyen, 2008. "New Technology, Human Capital and Growth for European Transitional Economies," THEMA Working Papers 2008-07, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
  4. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00470647 is not listed on IDEAS

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