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How do Immigrants Fare in Retirement?

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Author Info

  • Purvi Sevak

    (Hunter College)

  • Lucie Schmidt

    (Williams College)

Abstract

Existing literature suggests that immigrants receive lower wages than U.S.-born workers with similar characteristics. This could imply that immigrant households would enter retirement at a significant financial disadvantage. In this paper, we examine the retirement resources available to immigrant families by examining Social Security benefits, pension coverage, and private wealth accumulation. Our results suggest that although immigrant families may be financially better-off in the U.S. than in their native countries, they do enter retirement at a significant financial disadvantage relative to native born households with similar characteristics.

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File URL: http://www.mrrc.isr.umich.edu/publications/Papers/pdf/wp169.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center in its series Working Papers with number wp169.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mrr:papers:wp169

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Cited by:
  1. Kevin O’Neil & Marta Tienda, 2012. "Age at Immigration and the Incomes of Older Immigrants, 1994 to 2010," Working Papers 1423, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
  2. Pervi Sevak & Lucie Schmidt, 2008. "Immigrant-Native Fertility and Mortality Differentials in the United States," Working Papers wp181, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.

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