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Technology and Child Development: Evidence from the One Laptop per Child Program

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Author Info

  • Cristia, Julián P.

    ()
    (Inter-American Development Bank)

  • Ibarrarán, Pablo

    ()
    (Inter-American Development Bank)

  • Cueto, Santiago

    ()
    (GRADE)

  • Santiago, Ana

    ()
    (Inter-American Development Bank)

  • Severín, Eugenio

    ()
    (Inter-American Development Bank)

Abstract

Although many countries are aggressively implementing the One Laptop per Child (OLPC) program, there is a lack of empirical evidence on its effects. This paper presents the impact of the first large-scale randomized evaluation of the OLPC program, using data collected after 15 months of implementation in 319 primary schools in rural Peru. The results indicate that the program increased the ratio of computers per student from 0.12 to 1.18 in treatment schools. This expansion in access translated into substantial increases in use both at school and at home. No evidence is found of effects on enrollment and test scores in Math and Language. Some positive effects are found, however, in general cognitive skills as measured by Raven's Progressive Matrices, a verbal fluency test and a Coding test.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 6401.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6401

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Keywords: education; technology; experiments;

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References

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  1. Machin, Stephen & McNally, Sandra & Silva, Olmo, 2006. "New Technology in Schools: Is There a Payoff?," IZA Discussion Papers 2234, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Jacob L. Vigdor & Helen F. Ladd, 2010. "Scaling the Digital Divide: Home Computer Technology and Student Achievement," NBER Working Papers 16078, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Lisa Barrow & Lisa Markham & Cecilia Elena Rouse, 2007. "Technology’s edge: the educational benefits of computer-aided instruction," Working Paper Series WP-07-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  4. Barrera-Osorio, Felipe & Linden, Leigh L., 2009. "The use and misuse of computers in education : evidence from a randomized experiment in Colombia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4836, The World Bank.
  5. Ofer Malamud & Cristian Pop-Eleches, 2010. "Home Computer Use and the Development of Human Capital," NBER Working Papers 15814, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Paul Carrillo & Mercedes Onofa & Juan Ponce, 2011. "Information Technology and Student Achievement: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in Ecuador," Research Department Publications 4698, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
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Cited by:
  1. Mo, Di & Swinnen, Johan & Zhang, Linxiu & Yi, Hongmei & Qu, Qinghe & Boswell, Matthew & Rozelle, Scott, 2013. "Can One-to-One Computing Narrow the Digital Divide and the Educational Gap in China? The Case of Beijing Migrant Schools," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 14-29.
  2. Diether W. Beuermann & Julian P. Cristia & Yyannu Cruz-Aguayo & Santiago Cueto & Ofer Malamud, 2013. "Home Computers and Child Outcomes: Short-Term Impacts from a Randomized Experiment in Peru," NBER Working Papers 18818, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Robert W. Fairlie & Jonathan Robinson, 2013. "Experimental Evidence on the Effects of Home Computers on Academic Achievement among Schoolchildren," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(3), pages 211-40, July.
  4. Dorothea Kleine & David Hollow & Sammia Poveda & UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2014. "Children, ICT and Development: Capturing the potential, meeting the challenges," Innocenti Insight innins715, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.
  5. German Bet & Julian Cristia & Pablo Ibarraran, 2014. "The Effects of Shared School Technology Access on Students’ Digital Skills in Peru," Research Department Publications IDB-WP-476, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  6. Bekkerman, Anton & Gilpin, Gregory, 2013. "High-speed Internet growth and the demand for locally accessible information content," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 1-10.

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