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¿Sin formación no hay buenos empleos? Elementos de juicio sobre la relación entre la formación y la segmentación del mercado laboral

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  • Carmen Pagés-Serra

    ()

  • Marco Stampini

Abstract

En este trabajo se analiza la segmentación del mercado laboral entre empleos asalariados formales e informales y el empleo independiente en tres países latinoamericanos y tres países en transición. Se analizan por separado los mercados de mano de obra calificada y no calificada, se averigua si la segmentación es una característica exclusiva de esta última. Se hallan pruebas de una prima salarial formal en comparación con los empleos asalariados informales en los tres países latinoamericanos, pero no en las economías en transición. También se hallan pruebas de una movilidad extendida a través de estos dos tipos de empleos en todos los países. Estos patrones hacen pensar que existe una preferencia hacia los empleos asalariados del sector formal sobre los del sector informal en todos los países analizados. Por contraste, hay muy poca movilidad entre empleos independientes y empleos asalariados en el sector formal, lo que sugiere la existencia de barreras de este tipo de movilidad o de aversión de los trabajadores a ello. Por último, tanto para los diferenciales salariales como para los de movilidad, los mercados de mano de obra calificada y no calificada se ven afectados de maneras similares por la segmentación.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department in its series Research Department Publications with number 4562.

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Date of creation: Nov 2007
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Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4562

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