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Informality : Exit and Exclusion

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  • Guillermo E. Perry
  • William F. Maloney
  • Omar S. Arias
  • Pablo Fajnzylber
  • Andrew D. Mason
  • Jaime Saavedra-Chanduvi

Abstract

Informality: exit and exclusion analyzes informality in Latin America, exploring root causes and reasons for and implications of its growth. The authors use two distinct but complementary lenses: informality driven by exclusion from state benefits or the circuits of the modern economy, and driven by voluntary 'exit' decisions resulting from private cost-benefit calculations that lead workers and firms to opt out of formal institutions. They find both lenses have considerable explanatory power to understand the causes and consequences of informality in the region. Informality: exit and exclusion concludes that reducing informality levels and overcoming the 'culture of informality' will require actions to increase aggregate productivity in the economy, reform poorly designed regulations and social policies, and increase the legitimacy of the state by improving the quality and fairness of state institutions and policies. Although the study focuses on Latin America, its analysis, approach, and conclusions are relevant for all developing countries.

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Bibliographic Info

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This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 6730 and published in 2007.

ISBN: 0-8213-7092-8
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:6730

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Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
Phone: (202) 477-1234
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Web page: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org
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Related research

Keywords: Social Protections and Labor - Labor Markets Banks and Banking Reform Social Protections and Labor - Labor Standards Work and Working Conditions Tertiary Education Finance and Financial Sector Development Education;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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  1. repec:reg:rpubli:271 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Frank A. Cowell, 1990. "Cheating the Government: The Economics of Evasion," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262532484, December.
  3. James Alm & Benno Torgler, 2004. "Culture Differences and Tax Morale in the United States and in Europe," CREMA Working Paper Series 2004-14, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
  4. Eduardo Lora, 2008. "El Futuro de los Pactos Fiscales en América Latina," IDB Publications 7653, Inter-American Development Bank.
  5. Loayza, Norman A., 1997. "The economics of the informal sector : a simple model and some empirical evidence from Latin America," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1727, The World Bank.
  6. Charles F. Manski, 2000. "Economic Analysis of Social Interactions," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(3), pages 115-136, Summer.
  7. Chong, Alberto & Gradstein, Mark, 2007. "Inequality and informality," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1-2), pages 159-179, February.
  8. Saul D. Hoffman & Laurence S. Seidman, 2003. "Helping Working Families: The Earned Income Tax Credit," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number hwf, December.
  9. Howell H. Zee & Vito Tanzi, 2000. "Tax Policy for Emerging Markets," IMF Working Papers 00/35, International Monetary Fund.
  10. Loayza, Norman V. & Oviedo, Ana Mar & Serv�n, Luis, 2005. "The Impact of Regulation on Growth and Informality: Cross-Country Evidence," Working paper 271, Regulation2point0.
  11. Grasmick, Harold G. & Scott, Wilbur J., 1982. "Tax evasion and mechanisms of social control: A comparison with grand and petty theft," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 213-230, September.
  12. Alm, James & Sanchez, Isabel & de Juan, Ana, 1995. "Economic and Noneconomic Factors in Tax Compliance," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1), pages 3-18.
  13. Eduardo Engel & Alexander Galetovic & Claudio Raddatz, 1998. "Taxes and Income Distribution in Chile: Some Unpleasant Redistributive Arithmetic," Documentos de Trabajo 41, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
  14. James Alm & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez, 2007. "Tax Morale and Tax Evasion in Latin American Countries," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0732, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  15. James Alm & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez, 2007. "Tax Morale and Tax Evasion in Latin America," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0704, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  16. Benno Torgler, 2003. "Tax Morale in Latin America," Working papers 2003/03, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
  17. Tanzi, Vito & Zee, Howell H., 2000. "Tax Policy for Emerging Markets: Developing Countries," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 53(n. 2), pages 299-322, June.
  18. Ke-young Chu & Hamid Reza Davoodi & Sanjeev Gupta, 2000. "Income Distribution and Tax and Government Social Spending Policies in Developing Countries," IMF Working Papers 00/62, International Monetary Fund.
  19. Richard M. Bird & Eric M. Zolt, 2014. "Redistribution via Taxation: The Limited Role of the Personal Income Tax in Developing Countries," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 15(2), pages 625-683, November.
  20. Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & Benno Torgler, 2007. "The Evolution of Tax Morale in Modern Spain," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0719, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.
  21. Chu, K.-y. & Davoodi, H. & Gupta, S., 2000. "Income Distribution and Tax, and Government Social Spending Policies in Developing Countries," Research Paper 214, World Institute for Development Economics Research.
  22. World Bank, 2005. "World Development Indicators 2005," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 12426, October.
  23. Suzanne Duryea & Analía Olgiati & Leslie Stone, 2006. "The Under-Registration of Births in Latin America," Research Department Publications 4443, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  24. John Schmitt, 2005. "Is It Time to Export the U.S. Tax Model to Latin America?," Challenge, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 48(3), pages 84-108, May.
  25. Loayza, Norman V. & Rigolini, Jamele, 2006. "Informality trends and cycles," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4078, The World Bank.
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