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Entrepreneurial Spin-Outs and Vanishing Technological Trajectory: Laser Diodes in the U.S. and Japan

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Author Info

  • Shimizu, Hiroshi
  • Wakutsu, Naohiko

Abstract

By exploring the patterns of laser-diode technological development in the U.S. and Japan and theoretically examining market conditions and institutions that promote entrepreneurial spin-outs from a parental company, this study reveals how the existence and absence of entrepreneurial spin-out influence the ways in which technological trajectories emerge. It shows that vibrant entrepreneurial spin-out could hinder technological development, since the cumulative effects of incremental innovations on the technological trajectories could vanish if many firms spun out to target untapped sub-markets.

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File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/26112/1/070iirWP13_21.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute of Innovation Research, Hitotsubashi University in its series IIR Working Paper with number 13-21.

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Length: 30 p.
Date of creation: Jan 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hit:iirwps:13-21

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Web page: http://www.iir.hit-u.ac.jp/
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Related research

Keywords: Innovation; Entrepreneurial Spin-Outs; Technological Trajectory; R&D Competition; Sub-markets; General Purpose Technology;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

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  1. Hiroshi Shimizu, 2011. "SCIENTIFIC BREAKTHROUGHS AND NETWORKS IN THE CASE OF SEMICONDUCTOR LASER TECHNOLOGY IN THE US AND JAPAN, 1960s–2000s," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 51(1), pages 71-96, 03.
  2. Dosi, Giovanni, 1993. "Technological paradigms and technological trajectories : A suggested interpretation of the determinants and directions of technical change," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 102-103, April.
  3. Hiroshi Shimizu, 2010. "Different evolutionary paths: Technological development of laser diodes in the US and Japan, 1960-2000," Business History, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(7), pages 1151-1181.
  4. Hellmann, Thomas F., 2002. "When Do Employees Become Entrepreneurs?," Research Papers 1770, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
  5. Petra Moser & Tom Nicholas, 2004. "Was Electricity a General Purpose Technology? Evidence from Historical Patent Citations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 388-394, May.
  6. Klepper, Steven & Thompson, Peter, 2010. "Disagreements and intra-industry spinoffs," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 526-538, September.
  7. Anderson, Simon P & Engers, Maxim, 2005. "Participation Games: Market Entry, Coordination and the Beautiful Blonde," CEPR Discussion Papers 5241, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. S. Klepper & S. Sleeper, 2002. "Entry by Spinoffs," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2002-07, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Evolutionary Economics Group.
  9. April Mitchell Franco & Darren Filson, 2000. "Knowledge Diffusion through Employee Mobility," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2000-61, Claremont Colleges.
  10. Rosenberg, Nathan & Steinmueller, W Edward, 1988. "Why Are Americans Such Poor Imitators?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 229-34, May.
  11. Guido Buenstorf & Steven Klepper, 2009. "Submarket Dynamics and Innovation: The Case of the U.S. Tire Industry," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2009-15, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Evolutionary Economics Group.
  12. Peter Thompson & Jing Chen, 2011. "Disagreements, employee spinoffs and the choice of technology," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 14(3), pages 455-474, July.
  13. Suarez, Fernando F., 2004. "Battles for technological dominance: an integrative framework," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 271-286, March.
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