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Unemployment, Splitting Up and Spousal Income Replacement

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  • Nilsson, William

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Umeå University)

Abstract

In this study, the consequences of unemployment for a Swedish sample of couples are analyzed. The purpose is to estimate the possible income replacement that a spouse can provide. Unemployment can also affect the probability that the couples split up. Since not all couples remain in the analysis, a potential selection problem can occur. To deal with this problem, and also to take care of unobserved heterogeneity, a sample selection model for panel data is estimated. The results indicate that it is necessary to take into account the selection problem. A period in unemployment is found to be correlated with a higher female income only in the case of men who earned a fairly high income before becoming unemployed. Women who earned a fairly low income and were subject to a long period of unemployment are found to be compensated by a higher male income.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Umeå University, Department of Economics in its series Umeå Economic Studies with number 651.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: 08 Apr 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:umnees:0651

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Postal: Department of Economics, Umeå University, S-901 87 Umeå, Sweden
Phone: 090 - 786 61 42
Fax: 090 - 77 23 02
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Web page: http://www.econ.umu.se/
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Keywords: unemployment; divorce; spousal response; sample selection; panel data;

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References

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  1. Weiss, Yoram & Willis, Robert J, 1997. "Match Quality, New Information, and Marital Dissolution," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages S293-329, January.
  2. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
  3. Melvin Stephens Jr., 2001. "Worker Displacement and the Added Worker Effect," NBER Working Papers 8260, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Heckman, James J & Macurdy, Thomas E, 1980. "A Life Cycle Model of Female Labour Supply," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1), pages 47-74, January.
  5. Dustmann, Christian & Rochina-Barrachina, María Engracia, 2000. "Selection Correction in Panel Data Models: An Application to Labour Supply and Wages," IZA Discussion Papers 162, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Ekaterini Kyriazidou, 1997. "Estimation of a Panel Data Sample Selection Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(6), pages 1335-1364, November.
  7. Becker, Gary S & Landes, Elisabeth M & Michael, Robert T, 1977. "An Economic Analysis of Marital Instability," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(6), pages 1141-87, December.
  8. Kraft, Kornelius, 2001. "Unemployment and the Separation of Married Couples," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(1), pages 67-87.
  9. Maloney, Tim, 1991. "Unobserved Variables and the Elusive Added Worker Effect," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 58(230), pages 173-87, May.
  10. Charlier, Erwin & Melenberg, Bertrand & van Soest, Arthur, 2001. "An analysis of housing expenditure using semiparametric models and panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 101(1), pages 71-107, March.
  11. Kerwin Kofi Charles & Melvin Stephens Jr., 2001. "Job Displacement, Disability, and Divorce," NBER Working Papers 8578, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Jan Erik Askildsen & Badi H. Baltagi & Tor Helge Holmås, 2003. "Wage policy in the health care sector: a panel data analysis of nurses' labour supply," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(9), pages 705-719.
  13. Dynarski, Mark & Sheffrin, Steven M, 1987. "Consumption and Unemployment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 102(2), pages 411-28, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Liat Raz-Yurovich, 2011. "Economic determinants of divorce among dual-earner couples: Jews in Israel," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2011-008, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  2. William Nilsson, 2008. "Spousal Income and Sick Leave: What do Twins Tell us About Causality?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 407-426, September.

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