Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Carbon Prices and Incentives for Technological Development

Contents:

Author Info

  • Lundgren, Tommy

    ()
    (CERE, Centre for Environmental and Resource Economics)

  • Marklund, Per-Olov

    ()
    (CERUM, Centre for Regional Science)

  • Samakovlis, Eva

    ()
    (National Institute of Economic Research)

  • Zhou, Wenchao

    ()
    (CERUM, Centre for Regional Science)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    How to significantly decrease carbon dioxide emissions has become one of the largest challenges faced by modern society. The standard recipe prescribed by most economists is to put a price on carbon, either through a tax or through emissions trading. Such measures can reduce emissions cost-effectively and create incentives for technological development. There is, however, a growing concern that the carbon prices generated through the European Union emission trading system (EU ETS) have been too low to create the incentives necessary to stimulate technological development. This paper empirically analyzes how the Swedish carbon dioxide tax and the EU ETS have affected productivity development in the Swedish pulp and paper industry 1998-2008. A Luenberger total factor productivity (TFP) indicator is computed using data envelopment analysis. How the policy measures affect TFP is assessed using a system generalized method of moments estimator. The results show that climate policy had a modest impact on technological development in the pulp and paper industry, and if significant it has been negative. The price on fossil fuels, on the contrary, seems to have created important incentives for technological development. Hence, results suggest that the carbon prices faced by the industry through EU ETS and the carbon dioxide tax have been too low.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www-sekon.slu.se/~gbost/CERE_WP2013-4.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by CERE - the Center for Environmental and Resource Economics in its series CERE Working Papers with number 2013:4.

    as in new window
    Length: 30 pages
    Date of creation: 02 May 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hhs:slucer:2013_004

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.cere.se

    Related research

    Keywords: CO2 tax; EU ETS; Luenberger productivity indicator; GMM;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Anger, Niels & Oberndorfer, Ulrich, 2008. "Firm performance and employment in the EU emissions trading scheme: An empirical assessment for Germany," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 12-22, January.
    2. R Blundell & Steven Bond, . "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data model," Economics Papers W14&104., Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    3. Yves Croissant & Giovanni Millo, . "Panel Data Econometrics in R: The plm Package," Journal of Statistical Software, American Statistical Association, vol. 27(i02).
    4. Fischer, Carolyn & Newell, Richard, 2004. "Environmental and Technology Policies for Climate Mitigation," Discussion Papers dp-04-05, Resources For the Future.
    5. Ralf Martin & Ulrich J. Wagner & Laure B. de Preux, 2009. "The impacts of the climate change levy on business: evidence from microdata," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 51588, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Windmeijer, Frank, 2005. "A finite sample correction for the variance of linear efficient two-step GMM estimators," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 126(1), pages 25-51, May.
    7. M Arellano & O Bover, 1990. "Another Look at the Instrumental Variable Estimation of Error-Components Models," CEP Discussion Papers dp0007, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    8. Lundgren, Tommy & Marklund, Per-Olov, 2010. "Climate Policy and Profit Efficiency," CERE Working Papers 2010:11, CERE - the Center for Environmental and Resource Economics.
    9. Brännlund, Runar & Lundgren, Tommy, 2009. "Environmental policy without costs? A review of the Porter hypothesis," Sustainable Investment and Corporate Governance Working Papers 2009/1, Sustainable Investment Research Platform.
    10. Maurice J.G. Bun & Frank Windmeijer, 2009. "The Weak Instrument Problem of the System GMM Estimator in Dynamic Panel Data Models," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-086/4, Tinbergen Institute.
    11. Lundgren, Tommy & Marklund, Per-Olov, 2010. "Climate Policy and Profit Efficiency," Sustainable Investment and Corporate Governance Working Papers 2010/12, Sustainable Investment Research Platform.
    12. Holtz-Eakin, Douglas & Newey, Whitney & Rosen, Harvey S, 1988. "Estimating Vector Autoregressions with Panel Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(6), pages 1371-95, November.
    13. Brännlund, Runar & Lundgren, Tommy, 2008. "Environmental policy and profitability - Evidence from Swedish industry," UmeÃ¥ Economic Studies 750, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    14. Commins, Nicola & Lyons, Seán & Schiffbauer, Marc & Tol, Richard S. J., 2009. "Climate Policy and Corporate Behaviour," Papers WP329, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    15. Ralf Martin & Laure B. de Preux & Ulrich J. Wagner, 2011. "The Impacts of the Climate Change Levy on Manufacturing: Evidence from Microdata," NBER Working Papers 17446, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Rolf Färe & Shawna Grosskopf & Carl A Pasurka, Jr., 2001. "Accounting for Air Pollution Emissions in Measures of State Manufacturing Productivity Growth," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(3), pages 381-409.
    17. Simar, Leopold & Wilson, Paul W., 2007. "Estimation and inference in two-stage, semi-parametric models of production processes," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 136(1), pages 31-64, January.
    18. Guan Zhengfei & Alfons Oude Lansink, 2006. "The Source of Productivity Growth in Dutch Agriculture: A Perspective from Finance," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(3), pages 644-656.
    19. Brannlund, Runar & Lundgren, Tommy, 2009. "Environmental Policy Without Costs? A Review of the Porter Hypothesis," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 3(2), pages 75-117, September.
    20. Arellano, Manuel & Bond, Stephen, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 277-97, April.
    21. Alonso-Borrego, Cesar & Arellano, Manuel, 1999. "Symmetrically Normalized Instrumental-Variable Estimation Using Panel Data," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 17(1), pages 36-49, January.
    22. William L. Weber & Bruce Domazlicky, 2001. "Productivity Growth and Pollution in State Manufacturing," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(1), pages 195-199, February.
    23. Brännlund, Runar & Lundgren, Tommy, 2009. "Environmental policy without costs? A review of the Porter hypothesis," UmeÃ¥ Economic Studies 766, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Brännlund, Runar & Lundgren, Tommy & Marklund, Per-Olov, 2014. "Carbon intensity in production and the effects of climate policy—Evidence from Swedish industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 844-857.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hhs:slucer:2013_004. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mona Bonta Bergman).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.