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In the Aftermath of Large Natural Disasters, what happens to foreign aid?

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Author Info

  • Oscar Becerra

    (Inter-American Development Bank)

  • Eduardo Cavallo

    (Inter-American Development Bank)

  • Ilan Noy

    ()
    (University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics)

Abstract

We examine Official Development Assistance (ODA) in the aftermath of large natural disasters in developing countries between 1970 and 2008. We find that while ODA increases significantly compared to pre-disaster flows, the typical surges are small in relation to the size of the affected economies or the estimated economic damages. Moreover, we find that the size of the surges is related to the catastrophic nature of the event itself and the lack of other resources available to the affected countries. However, we do not find robust evidence that political affinity between donors and affected countries, and common geo-strategic interests, matter for the allocation of post disaster aid.

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File URL: http://www.economics.hawaii.edu/research/workingpapers/WP_10-18.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 201018.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: 15 Sep 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hai:wpaper:201018

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Keywords: Natural Disasters; Foreign Aid; Official Development Assistance (ODA); event study.;

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References

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  1. Eduardo Cavallo & Andrew Powell & Oscar Becerra, 2010. "Estimating the Direct Economic Damages of the Earthquake in Haiti," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(546), pages F298-F312, 08.
  2. Chong, Alberto & Gradstein, Mark, 2008. "What determines foreign aid? The donors' perspective," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 1-13, August.
  3. Emmanuel Frot & Javier Santiso, 2011. "Herding in Aid Allocation," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(1), pages 54-74, 02.
  4. Matteo Bobba & Andrew Powell, 2006. "Multilateral Intermediation of Foreign Aid: What is the Trade-Off for Donor Countries?," Research Department Publications 4500, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  5. Matteo Bobba & Andrew Powell, 2007. "Aid and Growth: Politics Matters," Research Department Publications 4511, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  6. St├ęphane Hallegatte & Valentin Przyluski, 2010. "The Economics of Natural Disasters," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 11(2), pages 14-24, 07.
  7. Raschky, Paul A. & Schwindt, Manijeh, 2009. "On the channel and type of international disaster aid," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4953, The World Bank.
  8. Buffie, Edward F. & O'Connell, Stephen A. & Adam, Christopher, 2010. "Fiscal inertia, donor credibility, and the monetary management of aid surges," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(2), pages 287-298, November.
  9. David Antonio C., 2011. "How do International Financial Flows to Developing Countries Respond to Natural Disasters?," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 11(4), pages 1-38, December.
  10. Noy, Ilan, 2009. "The macroeconomic consequences of disasters," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 221-231, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Noy, Ilan, 2012. "Natural disasters and economic policy for the Pacific Rim," Working Paper Series 2088, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
  2. Lynham, J & Noy, I & Page, J, 2012. "The 1960 Tsunami in Hawaii: Long Term Consequences of a Coastal Disaster," Working Paper Series 2389, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.

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