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Natural Disasters, Economic Development, and Humanitarian Aid

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  • David Str�mberg
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    Abstract

    Natural disasters are one of the major problems facing humankind. Between 1980 and 2004, two million people were reported killed and five billion people cumulatively affected by around 7,000 natural disasters, according to the dataset maintained by the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED) at University of Louvain (Belgium). The economic costs are considerable and rising. The direct economic damage from natural disasters between 1980-2004 is estimated at around $1 trillion. This paper starts by describing the incidence of natural disasters, where they strike, and their development over time. It then discusses how societal factors act to protect people from or expose them to natural hazards. The final section discusses the determinants and targets of international aid to disaster victims.

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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.21.3.199
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal Journal of Economic Perspectives.

    Volume (Year): 21 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 3 (Summer)
    Pages: 199-222

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    Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:21:y:2007:i:3:p:199-222

    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.21.3.199
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    1. Maxx Dilley & Robert S. Chen & Uwe Deichmann & Arthur L. Lerner-Lam & Margaret Arnold, 2005. "Natural Disaster Hotspots: A Global Risk Analysis," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7376.
    2. Isham, Jonathan & Kaufmann, Daniel & Pritchett, Lant H, 1997. "Civil Liberties, Democracy, and the Performance of Government Projects," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 11(2), pages 219-42, May.
    3. Matthew E. Kahn, 2005. "The Death Toll from Natural Disasters: The Role of Income, Geography, and Institutions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(2), pages 271-284, May.
    4. Collier, Paul & Dollar, David, 2002. "Aid allocation and poverty reduction," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(8), pages 1475-1500, September.
    5. Tobias N. Rasmussen, 2004. "Macroeconomic Implications of Natural Disasters in the Caribbean," IMF Working Papers 04/224, International Monetary Fund.
    6. P. Peduzzi & H. Herold, 2005. "Mapping Disastrous Natural Hazards Using Global Datasets," Natural Hazards, International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 35(2), pages 265-289, 06.
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    Cited by:
    1. Hosono, Kaoru & Miyakawa, Daisuke & Uchino, Taisuke & Hazama, Makoto & Ono, Arito & Uchida, Hirofumi & Uesugi, Iichiro, 2012. "Natural Disasters, Damage to Banks, and Firm Investment," Working Paper Series 18, Center for Interfirm Network, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    2. Bellemare, Marc F., 2011. "Rising food prices, food price volatility, and political unrest," MPRA Paper 31888, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Eduardo Cavallo & Ilan Noy, 2009. "The Economics of Natural Disasters - A Survey," Working Papers 200919, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    4. Amir AghaKouchak & Nasrin Nasrollahi, 2010. "Semi-parametric and Parametric Inference of Extreme Value Models for Rainfall Data," Water Resources Management, Springer, vol. 24(6), pages 1229-1249, April.
    5. Shively, Gerald E. & Ward, Patrick S. & Diffenbaugh, Noah S., 2009. "Vulnerability, Income Growth and Climate Change," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 49943, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Monica Escaleras & Charles Register, 2012. "Fiscal decentralization and natural hazard risks," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 151(1), pages 165-183, April.
    7. Smets, Lodewijk & Knack, Stephen & Molenaers, Nadia, 2012. "Political ideology, quality at entry and the success of economic reform programs," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6130, The World Bank.
    8. Fuchs, Andreas & Klann, Nils-Hendrik, 2013. "Emergency Aid 2.0," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79898, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    9. Matthew A. COLE & Robert J R ELLIOTT & OKUBO Toshihiro & Eric STROBL, 2013. "Natural Disasters and Plant Survival: The impact of the Kobe earthquake," Discussion papers 13063, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    10. David Fielding, 2011. "The Dynamics of Aid and Political Rights," Working Papers 1102, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2011.
    11. Youngwan Kim & Peter Nunnenkamp & Chandreyee Bagchi, 2014. "Natural Disasters and Private Donations to NGOs: The Effects of Being Present after the Tsunami in the Indian Ocean," Kiel Working Papers 1890, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
    12. SAWADA Yasuyuki & NAKATA Hiroyuki & SEKIGUCHI Kunio, 2014. "Natural Disasters, Land Price, and Location of Firms: Evidence from Thailand," Discussion papers 14029, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    13. Goetz von Peter & Sebastian von Dahlen & Sweta C Saxena, 2012. "Unmitigated disasters? New evidence on the macroeconomic cost of natural catastrophes," BIS Working Papers 394, Bank for International Settlements.
    14. Sauro Mocetti & Guglielmo Barone, 2013. "Natural disasters, economic growth and corruption: a tale from two earthquakes," ERSA conference papers ersa13p726, European Regional Science Association.
    15. Jesse Chandler & Tiffany M. Griffin & Nicholas Sorensen, 2008. "In the "I" of the storm: Shared initials increase disaster donations," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 3, pages 404-410, June.
    16. Kousky, Carolyn & Walls, Margaret, 2013. "Floodplain Conservation as a Flood Mitigation Strategy: Examining Costs and Benefits," Discussion Papers dp-13-22-rev, Resources For the Future.
    17. Kousky, Carolyn, 2012. "Informing Climate Adaptation: A Review of the Economic Costs of Natural Disasters, Their Determinants, and Risk Reduction Options," Discussion Papers dp-12-28, Resources For the Future.
    18. Lis, Eliza M. & Nickel, Christiane, 2009. "The impact of extreme weather events on budget balances and implications for fiscal policy," Working Paper Series 1055, European Central Bank.
    19. Peter Simonsen, 2012. "Earthquakes and Economic Growth," Development Research Working Paper Series 01/2012, Institute for Advanced Development Studies.
    20. Guglielmo Barone & Sauro Mocetti, 2014. "Natural disasters, growth and institutions: a tale of two earthquakes," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 949, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

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