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How do International Financial Flows to Developing Countries Respond to Natural Disasters?

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  • David Antonio C.

    ()
    (International Monetary Fund)

Abstract

This paper uses multivariate dynamic panel analysis to examine the response of international financial flows to natural disasters. The models estimated for a large sample of developing countries point to differentiated responses of specific types of financial flows. The results show that remittance inflows increase significantly in response to shocks to both climatic and geological disasters, thus confirming their compensatory nature. The models suggest a nuanced role for foreign aid. While the responses of aid flows to natural disaster shocks in general tend not to be statistically significant, international assistance to low income countries increases following geological disaster shocks. Furthermore, the results show that typically, other private capital flows (bank lending and equity) do not attenuate the effects of disasters and in some specifications, even amplify the negative economic effects of these events.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal Global Economy Journal.

Volume (Year): 11 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 1-38

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Handle: RePEc:bpj:glecon:v:11:y:2011:i:4:n:1

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Cited by:
  1. BORJA, Karla, 2013. "Home And Host Country Business Cycles And Remittances: The Case Of El Salvador And The Dominican Republic," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 13(2), pages 101-118.
  2. Jean-Louis Combes & Christian Ebeke & Mireille Ntsama Etoundi & Thierry Yogo, 2012. "Are Foreign Aid and Remittances a Hedge against Food Price Shocks in Developing Countries?," Working Papers halshs-00608128, HAL.
  3. Yasser Abdih & Ralph Chami & Christian Ebeke & Adolfo Barajas, 2012. "Remittances Channel and Fiscal Impact in the Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia," IMF Working Papers 12/104, International Monetary Fund.
  4. Naudé, Wim & Bezuidenhout, Henri, 2012. "Remittances provide resilience against disasters in Africa," MERIT Working Papers 026, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  5. Faruk Balli & Syed Abul Basherz & Rosmy Jean Louis, 2012. "Risk Sharing in the Middle East and North Africa: The Role of Remittances and Factor Incomes," CAMA Working Papers 2012-39, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  6. Christian Hubert EBEKE, 2011. "Remittances, Countercyclicality, Openness and Government Size," Discussion Papers (REL - Recherches Economiques de Louvain) 2011044, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  7. Youngwan Kim & Peter Nunnenkamp & Chandreyee Bagchi, 2014. "Natural Disasters and Private Donations to NGOs: The Effects of Being Present after the Tsunami in the Indian Ocean," Kiel Working Papers 1890, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  8. Oscar Becerra & Eduardo Cavallo & Ilan Noy, 2010. "In the Aftermath of Large Natural Disasters, what happens to foreign aid?," Working Papers 201018, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
  9. Bharati Basu & James T. Bang, 2013. "Insurance and remittances: New evidence from Latin American immigrants to the US," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 10(3), pages 383-398, September.
  10. International Monetary Fund, 2012. "Are Foreign Aid and Remittance Inflows a Hedge Against Food Price Shocks?," IMF Working Papers 12/67, International Monetary Fund.
  11. Combes, Jean-Louis & Ebeke, Christian Hubert & Etoundi, Sabine Mireille Ntsama & Yogo, Thierry Urbain, 2014. "Are Remittances and Foreign Aid a Hedge Against Food Price Shocks in Developing Countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 81-98.

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