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Migrant Networks as substitute for institutions: Evidence from Swiss trade

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Abstract

This paper uses an untapped dataset on Swiss immigration and a novel instrumental variable to test three channels through which migrants promote trade. The main finding is that migrant networks are an effective substitute for formal institutions in facilitating trade. The effect takes place entirely on the extensive margin, suggesting migrant networks may be reducing fixed entry costs characterized by corruption.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies in its series IHEID Working Papers with number 03-2010.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:gii:giihei:heidwp03-2010

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Keywords: trade; migration; corruption;

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References

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  1. Beata S. Javorcik & Çaglar Özden & Mariana Spatareanu & Cristina Neagu, 2006. "Migrant Networks and Foreign Direct Investment," Working Papers Rutgers University, Newark 2006-003, Department of Economics, Rutgers University, Newark.
  2. Gabriel J. Felbermayr & Benjamin Jung & Farid Toubal, 2009. "Ethnic Networks, Information, and International Trade: Revisiting the Evidence," Working Papers 2009-30, CEPII research center.
  3. Subhayu Bandyopadhyay & Cletus C. Coughlin & Howard J. Wall, 2007. "Ethnic networks and U.S. exports," Working Papers 2005-069, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  4. James A. Dunlevy, 2006. "The Influence of Corruption and Language on the Protrade Effect of Immigrants: Evidence from the American States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(1), pages 182-186, February.
  5. James E. Rauch & Vitor Trindade, 1999. "Ethnic Chinese Networks in International Trade," NBER Working Papers 7189, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Felbermayr, Gabriel & Toubal, Farid, 2012. "Revisiting the Trade-Migration Nexus: Evidence from New OECD Data," Munich Reprints in Economics 20350, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  7. Thomas Chaney, 2008. "Distorted Gravity: The Intensive and Extensive Margins of International Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1707-21, September.
  8. Eric Neumayer, 2005. "Unequal Access to Foreign Spaces: How States Use Visa Restrictions to Regulate Mobility in a Globalised World," Labor and Demography 0503005, EconWPA.
  9. Pamina Koenig, 2009. "Immigration and the export decision to the home country," PSE Working Papers halshs-00574972, HAL.
  10. repec:pse:psecon:2009-31 is not listed on IDEAS
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