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Using Mixture Models to Detect Sex Bias in Health Outcomes in Bangladesh

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  • Jonathan J. Morduch
  • Hall S. Stern

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Harvard - Institute of Economic Research in its series Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers with number 1728.

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Date of creation: 1995
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Handle: RePEc:fth:harver:1728

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References

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  1. Dickens, William T & Lang, Kevin, 1985. "A Test of Dual Labor Market Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 792-805, September.
  2. Kiefer, Nicholas M, 1978. "Discrete Parameter Variation: Efficient Estimation of a Switching Regression Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(2), pages 427-34, March.
  3. Jonathan J. Morduch & Hall S. Stern, 1995. "Using Mixture Models to Detect Sex Bias in Health Outcomes in Bangladesh," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1728, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  4. Ahmad, A. & Morduch, J., 1993. "Identifying Sex Bias in the Allocation of Household Resources: Evidence from Linked Household Surveys from Bangladesh," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1636, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  5. Heckman, James J, 1990. "Varieties of Selection Bias," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 313-18, May.
  6. Thomas Mroz, . "The Sensitivity of an Empirical Model of Married Women's Hours of Work to Economic and Statistical Assumptions," University of Chicago - Population Research Center 84-8, Chicago - Population Research Center.
  7. Newey, Whitney K & Powell, James L & Walker, James R, 1990. "Semiparametric Estimation of Selection Models: Some Empirical Results," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 324-28, May.
  8. Deaton, Angus S, 1989. "Looking for Boy-Girl Discrimination in Household Expenditure Data," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 3(1), pages 1-15, January.
  9. Strauss, John & Thomas, Duncan, 1995. "Human resources: Empirical modeling of household and family decisions," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 34, pages 1883-2023 Elsevier.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Morduch, Jonathan J. & Stern, Hal S., 1997. "Using mixture models to detect sex bias in health outcomes in Bangladesh," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 259-276, March.
  2. Laura Zimmermann, 2012. "Reconsidering Gender Bias in Intrahousehold Allocation in India," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(1), pages 151-163, September.
  3. Marine H. Carrasco & Jean-Pierre Florens, 2000. "Estimation of a Mixture via the Empirical Characteristic Function," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0514, Econometric Society.
  4. David Brasington, 2002. "Differences in the Production of Education Across Regions and Urban and Rural Areas," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 137-145.
  5. Deb, Partha & Gallo, William T. & Ayyagari, Padmaja & Fletcher, Jason M. & Sindelar, Jody L., 2011. "The effect of job loss on overweight and drinking," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 317-327, March.
  6. Sonia Bhalotra & Cliff Attfield, 1998. "Intrahousehold resource allocation in rural Pakistan: a semi-parametric analysis," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6679, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  7. Antipov, Evgeny & Pokryshevskaya, Elena, 2010. "Accounting for latent classes in movie box office modeling," MPRA Paper 27644, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Partha Deb & Ann M. Holmes, 2000. "Estimates of use and costs of behavioural health care: a comparison of standard and finite mixture models," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(6), pages 475-489.
  9. Pal, Sarmistha, 1999. "An Analysis of Childhood Malnutrition in Rural India: Role of Gender, Income and Other Household Characteristics," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(7), pages 1151-1171, July.
  10. Deb, Partha & TRIVEDI, PRAVIN K, 1998. "Moment-based Estimation of Latent Class Models of Event Counts," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt6r282286, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
  11. Partha Deb & Karen Smith Conway, 2002. "Is Prenatal Care Really Ineffective? Or, is the 'Devil' in the Distribution?," Hunter College Department of Economics Working Papers 02/2, Hunter College: Department of Economics.
  12. Brutscher, P., 2012. "Self-Disconnection Among Pre-Payment Customers - A Behavioural Analysis," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1214, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  13. Provencher, Bill & Bishop, R.C.Richard C., 2004. "Does accounting for preference heterogeneity improve the forecasting of a random utility model? A case study," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 793-810, July.
  14. Diane Dancer & Anu Rammohan & Murray D. Smith, 2008. "Infant mortality and child nutrition in Bangladesh," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(9), pages 1015-1035.
  15. Vincenzo Atella & Francesco Brindisi & Partha Deb & Furio C. Rosati, 2003. "Determinants of Access to Physician Services in Italy: A Latent Class Seemingly Unrelated Probit Approach," CEIS Research Paper 36, Tor Vergata University, CEIS.
  16. Prescott, Edward Simpson & Townsend, Robert M., 2002. "Collective Organizations versus Relative Performance Contracts: Inequality, Risk Sharing, and Moral Hazard," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 103(2), pages 282-310, April.
  17. Chen, Zhuo, 2007. "Development and inequality: Evidence from an endogenous switching regression without regime separation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 269-274, August.
  18. Deb, Partha & Trivedi, Pravin K., 2002. "The structure of demand for health care: latent class versus two-part models," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 601-625, July.

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