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The Formation and Dissolution of Families: Why Marry? Who Marries Whom ? and What Happens Upon Marriage and Divorce

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  • Weiss, Y.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Chicago - Economics Research Center in its series University of Chicago - Economics Research Center with number 92-7.

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Length: 67 pages
Date of creation: 1992
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:chicer:92-7

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Postal: UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, ECONOMICS RESEARCH CENTER, NORC, CHICAGO ILLINOIS 60637 U.S.A.
Phone: (773)834-0761
Web page: http://economics.uchicago.edu/research.shtml
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Related research

Keywords: marriage ; family;

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Cited by:
  1. Martin Halla & Johann Scharler, 2008. "Marriage, Divorce and Interstate Risk Sharing," Economics working papers 2008-16, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  2. Stutzer, Alois & Frey, Bruno S., 2006. "Does marriage make people happy, or do happy people get married?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 326-347, April.
  3. Cohen-Goldner, Sarit & Gotlibovski, Chemi & Kahana, Nava, 2006. "The Role of Marriage in Immigrants’ Human Capital Investment under Liquidity Constraints," IZA Discussion Papers 2308, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Ermisch, John & Francesconi, Marco, 2002. "Intergenerational Social Mobility and Assortative Mating in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 465, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Morten Bennedsen & Kasper Nielsen & Francisco Pérez-González & Daniel Wolfenzon, 2005. "Inside the Family Firm: The Role of Families in Succession Decisions and Performance," CIE Discussion Papers 2005-13, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Industrial Economics, revised Sep 2005.
  6. Joost de Laat, 2008. "Household Allocations and Endogenous Information," Cahiers de recherche 0827, CIRPEE.
  7. Dan Anderberg, 2001. "An Equilibrium Analysis of Marriage, Divorce and Risk-Sharing," CESifo Working Paper Series 555, CESifo Group Munich.
  8. Bruno S. Frey & Alois Stutzer, . "Testing Theories of Happiness," IEW - Working Papers 147, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.

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