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An Expressive Voting Theory Of Strikes

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Author Info

  • GLAZER, A.

Abstract

Union members may vote for a strike even if they do not expect to thereby increase their wages. For under majority voting any one member's vote for a strike is unlikely to be decisive. A union member who obtains a noninfinitesimal emotional benefit from the act of voting for a strike may therefore vote in its favor. This hypothesis can explain the existence of strikes and the conditions that make strikes especially likely. Copyright 1992 by Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by California Irvine - School of Social Sciences in its series Papers with number 89-4.

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Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: 1989
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:calirv:89-4

Contact details of provider:
Postal: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA IRVINE, SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES, IRVINECALIFORNIA 91717 U.S.A.

Related research

Keywords: trade unions ; voting ; strikes;

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Cited by:
  1. Christa Brunnschweiler & Colin Jennings & Ian MacKenzie, 2012. "Rebellion against Reason? A Study of Expressive Choice and Strikes," Working Papers 1205, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
  2. Colin Jennings & Alan Hamlin, 2004. "Leadership and Conflict," Economics Series Working Papers 200, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  3. Hillman, Arye L., 2010. "Expressive behavior in economics and politics," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 403-418, December.
  4. Reiner Eichenberger & Felix Oberholzer-Gee, 1998. "Rational moralists: The role of fairness in democratic economic politics," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 94(1), pages 191-210, January.
  5. Kallbekken, Steffen & Kroll, Stephan & Cherry, Todd L., 2011. "Do you not like Pigou, or do you not understand him? Tax aversion and revenue recycling in the lab," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 53-64, July.
  6. Amihai Glazer, 2008. "Voting to anger and to please others," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 134(3), pages 247-254, March.
  7. Tyran, Jean-Robert, 2004. "Voting when money and morals conflict: an experimental test of expressive voting," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1645-1664, July.

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