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The effect of neighborhood contagion on mortgage selection

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  • Rubén Hernández-Murillo
  • Rajdeep Sengupta

Abstract

In this paper we conduct an empirical investigation of how neighborhood mortgage adoption contagion affects mortgage product choice, with an emphasis on Hispanic borrowers. We use loan-level mortgage data for metropolitan areas in California and Florida during 2004 and 2005, the peak years of the subprime mortgage boom. We identify an important and statistically significant effect of contagion on consumer choice of hybrid mortgage products that were popular during this period, especially for Hispanic borrowers.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in its series Working Papers with number 2011-036.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2011-036

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Keywords: Subprime mortgage ; Home Mortgage Disclosure Act ; Hispanic Americans;

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References

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  1. Joel Waldfogel, 1999. "Preference Externalities: An Empirical Study of Who Benefits Whom in Differentiated Product Markets," NBER Working Papers 7391, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Anthony Pennington-Cross & Joseph Nichols, 2000. "Credit History and the FHA-Conventional Choice," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 28(2), pages 307-336.
  3. Joel Waldfogel, 2005. "Does Consumer Irrationality Trump Consumer Sovereignty?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(4), pages 691-696, November.
  4. Edward C. Norton & Hua Wang & Chunrong Ai, 2004. "Computing interaction effects and standard errors in logit and probit models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(2), pages 154-167, June.
  5. Christopher Mayer & Karen Pence & Shane M. Sherlund, 2009. "The Rise in Mortgage Defaults," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(1), pages 27-50, Winter.
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Cited by:
  1. Grislain-Letrémy, Céline, 2013. "Natural Disasters: Exposure and Underinsurance," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/13276, Paris Dauphine University.
  2. C. Grislain-Letrémy, 2013. "Natural Disasters: Exposure and Underinsurance," Documents de Travail de la DESE - Working Papers of the DESE g2013-12, Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques, DESE.
  3. Céline Grislain-Letremy, 2013. "Natural Disters : Exposure and Underinsurance," Working Papers 2013-15, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique.

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