Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Minimum wages, labor market institutions, and youth employment: a cross-national analysis

Contents:

Author Info

  • David Naumark & William Wascher

Abstract

We estimate the employment effects of changes in national minimum wages using a pooled cross-section time-series data set comprising 17 OECD countries for the period 1975-2000, focusing on the impact of cross-country differences in minimum wage systems and in other labor market institutions and policies that may either offset or amplify the effects of minimum wages. The average minimum wage effects we estimate using this sample are consistent with the view that minimum wages cause employment losses among youths. However, the evidence also suggests that the employment effects of minimum wages vary considerably across countries. In particular, disemployment effects of minimum wages appear to be smaller in countries that have subminimum wage provisions for youths. Regarding other labor market policies and institutions, we find that more restrictive labor standards and higher union coverage strengthen the disemployment effects of minimum wages, while employment protection laws and active labor market policies designed to bring unemployed individuals into the work force help to offset these effects. Overall, the disemployment effects of minimum wages are strongest in the countries with the least regulated labor markets.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/feds/2003/200323/200323abs.html
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/feds/2003/200323/200323pap.pdf4
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.) in its series Finance and Economics Discussion Series with number 2003-23.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2003-23

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 20th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20551
Web page: http://www.federalreserve.gov/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Web: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/feds/fedsorder.html

Related research

Keywords: Minimum wage ; Labor market ; Employment (Economic theory);

Other versions of this item:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Dolado, Juan J. & Jansen, Marcel & Jimeno, Juan Francisco, 2005. "Dual Employment Protection Legislation: A Framework for Analysis," CEPR Discussion Papers 5033, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. David Neumark & William Wascher, 2004. "The Influence of Labour Market Institutions on the Disemployment Effects of the Minimum Wage," CESifo DICE Report, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 2(2), pages 40-47, 07.
  3. Mauricio Larraín & Joaquín Poblete, 2004. "Age-Differentiated Minimum Wages in a Dual Labor Market Model," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 268, Central Bank of Chile.
  4. Boockmann, Bernhard, 2010. "The Combined Employment Effects of Minimum Wages and Labor Market Regulation: A Meta-Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 4983, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Alok Kumar, 2008. "Capital Tax, Minimum Wage, and Labor Market Outcomes," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(1), pages 133-154, January.
  6. Matthew Webb & Arthur Sweetman & Casey Warman, 2012. "How Targeted is Targeted Tax Relief? Evidence from the Unemployment Insurance Youth Hires Program," Working Papers 1298, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  7. Juan J. Dolado & Marcel Jansen & Juan F. Jimeno, 2005. "On the Effects of Targeted Employment Policies," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series, in: Jorge Restrepo & Andrea Tokman R. & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (Series Edi (ed.), Labor Markets and Institutions, edition 1, volume 8, chapter 3, pages 061-076 Central Bank of Chile.
  8. Herwartz, Helmut & Niebuhr, Annekatrin, 2011. "Regional labor demand and national labor market institutions in the EU15," HWWI Research Papers 112, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
  9. Feldmann, Horst, 2009. "The unemployment effects of labor regulation around the world," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 76-90, March.
  10. Dolado, Juan José & Jansen, Marcel & Jimeno, Juan F., 2007. "A Positive Analysis of Targeted Employment Protection Legislation," IZA Discussion Papers 2679, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Hanna Frings, 2012. "The Employment Effect of Industry-Specific, Collectively-Bargained Minimum Wages," Ruhr Economic Papers 0348, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
  12. Margherita Comola & Luiz de Mello, 2009. "How Does Decentralised Minimum-Wage Setting Affect Unemployment and Informality?: The Case of Indonesia," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 710, OECD Publishing.
  13. Buscher, Herbert & Dreger, Christian & Ramos, Raul & Surinach, Jordi, 2005. "The Impact of Institutions on the Employment Performance in European Labour Markets," IZA Discussion Papers 1732, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. Skedinger, Per, 2007. "The Design and Effects of Collectively Agreed Minimum Wages: Evidence from Sweden," Working Paper Series 700, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  15. Daniel B. Klein & Stewart Dompe, 2007. "Reasons for Supporting the Minimum Wage: Asking Signatories of the "Raise the Minimum Wage" Statement," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 4(1), pages 125-167, January.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2003-23. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Kris Vajs).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.