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The autocatalytic character of the growth of production knowledge: What role does human labor play?

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  • Thomas Brenner

    ()

  • Christian Cordes

    ()

Abstract

This paper analyzes how the qualitative change in human labor occurs in mutual dependence with the advancement of the epistemic base of technology. Historically, a recurrent pattern can be identified: humans learned to successively transfer labor qualities to machines. The subsequent release of parts of the workforce from performing this labor enabled them to spend this spare time in the search for further technical innovations, i.e., the generation and application of ever-more knowledge. A model examines the autocatalytic relationship between the production of commodities and knowledge. The driving forces of these processes and the mechanisms that limit them are analyzed.

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File URL: ftp://137.248.191.199/RePEc/esi/discussionpapers/2004-12.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography in its series Papers on Economics and Evolution with number 2004-12.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:esi:evopap:2004-12

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Web page: http://www.uni-marburg.de/fb19/
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Keywords: technological change; long-term economic development; production; productivity growth; labor market;

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