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Long-term Tendencies in Technological Creativity - A Preference-based Approach

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  • C. Cordes

Abstract

Given the significance of technology in the course of socio-economic evolution, the driving forces behind the continuous accretion of technological knowledge deserve particular attention. This paper suggests a hypothesis about the motivational underpinnings of human technological creativity that is able to explain some long-term developments in human labor and technology. These motivational underpinnings are considered to being similar across human beings. They can therefore be assumed to imply some commonly shared elements of human preferences or wants.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Max Planck Institute of Economics, Evolutionary Economics Group in its series Papers on Economics and Evolution with number 2003-02.

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Date of creation: Feb 2003
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Handle: RePEc:esi:evopap:2003-02

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Related research

Keywords: evolutionary economics; creativity; human preferences; technological evolution; long-term economic development;

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Cited by:
  1. Christian Cordes, 2006. "Darwinism in economics: from analogy to continuity," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 16(5), pages 529-541, December.
  2. Guido Buenstorf & Christian Cordes, 2007. "Can Sustainable Consumption Be Learned?," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2007-06, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Evolutionary Economics Group.
  3. Chai, Andreas & Bradley, Graham & Lo, Alex Y. & Reser, Joseph, 2014. "What time to adapt? The role of discretionary time in sustaining the climate change value-action gap," MPRA Paper 53461, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Thomas Brenner & Christian Cordes, 2004. "The autocatalytic character of the growth of production knowledge: What role does human labor play?," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2004-12, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Evolutionary Economics Group.
  5. Kurt Dopfer, 2012. "The origins of meso economics," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 133-160, January.
  6. Buenstorf, Guido & Cordes, Christian, 2008. "Can sustainable consumption be learned? A model of cultural evolution," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(4), pages 646-657, November.

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