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Childbearing dynamics of couples in a universalistic welfare state: the role of labor-market status, country of origin, and gender

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  • Gunnar Andersson

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Kirk Scott

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

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    Abstract

    In this paper, we provide a study of childbearing dynamics by the labor-market status of co-residing one- and two-child parents in Sweden. We apply event-history techniques to longitudinal register data on life histories of foreign-born mothers from ten different countries and the partners to these women as well as a sample of Swedish-born mothers and their partners. Our context is a universalistic welfare state geared towards gender and social equality where formal social rights largely are independent of a person’s civil status, citizenship, and country of origin. We investigate to what extent the associations of parents’ labor-market status with childbearing in Sweden differ between women and men and by country of origin. We find that patterns of association are fairly similar on both these personal dimensions. As measured by the way labor-market activity of parents is related to their subsequent childbearing behavior, we find striking evidence of equality by gender as well as some evidence of integration of immigrants into the dynamics of Swedish society.

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    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2007-016.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its series MPIDR Working Papers with number WP-2007-016.

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    Length: 33 pages
    Date of creation: Apr 2007
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2007-016

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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    Keywords: Sweden; fertility; immigrants;

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    References

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    1. Gerda R. Neyer, 2003. "Family policies and low fertility in Western Europe," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-021, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Rosholm, Michael & Scott, Kirk & Husted, Leif, 2001. "The Times They are A-Changin': Organizational Change and Immigrant Employment Opportunities in Scandinavia," IZA Discussion Papers 258, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Pieter Bevelander & Helena Skyt Nielsen, 2001. "Declining employment success of immigrant males in Sweden: Observed or unobserved characteristics?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 455-471.
    4. Neyer, Gerda, 2003. "Family Policies and Low Fertility in Western Europe," Discussion Paper 161, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    5. Gunnar Andersson & Karsten Hank & Andres Vikat, 2007. "Understanding parental gender preferences in advanced societies: Lessons from Sweden and Finland," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(6), pages 135-156, October.
    6. Jesper B. Sorensen, 1999. "STPIECE: Stata module to estimate piecewise-constant hazard rate models," Statistical Software Components S396901, Boston College Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:
    1. Michaela Kreyenfeld & Gunnar Andersson, 2013. "Socioeconomic differences in the unemployment and fertility nexus: a comparison of Denmark and Germany," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2013-008, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Karin E. Lundström & Gunnar Andersson, 2012. "Labor-market status, migrant status and first childbearing in Sweden," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(25), pages 719-742, December.
    3. Hill Kulu & Paul Boyle & Gunnar Andersson, 2009. "High Suburban Fertility: Evidence from Four Northern European Countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(31), pages 915-944, December.
    4. Marika Jalovaara & Anneli Miettinen, 2013. "Does his paycheck also matter?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(31), pages 881-916, April.
    5. Gerda R. Neyer & Gunnar Andersson, 2007. "Consequences of family policies on childbearing behavior: effects or artifacts?," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2007-021, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    6. Anja Vatterrott, 2011. "The fertility behaviour of East to West German migrants," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2011-013, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

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