Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Analyzing Economic Policy Using High Order Perturbations

Contents:

Author Info

  • Ben-Gad, M.

Abstract

In this chapter I demonstrate the use of high order general perturbations to analyze policy changes in dynamic economic models. The inclusion of high moments in approximating the behavior of dynamic models is particularly necessary for welfare analysis. I apply the method of general perturbations to the analysis of permanent changes to a flat rate tax on the return to capital in the context of the standard Ramsey optimal growth model. Reliance on simple linearizations or quadratic approximations are adequate for generating impulse responses for the variables of interest or the welfare analysis of small policy changes. However when considering the welfare implications of sizable policy changes, the failure to include higher moments can lead not only to quantitatively serious inaccuracies, but even to spurious welfare reversals.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://openaccess.city.ac.uk/1497/1/0807_ben%2Dgad.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, City University London in its series Working Papers with number 08/07.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cty:dpaper:08/07

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Department of Economics, Social Sciences Building, City University London, Whiskin Street, London, EC1R 0JD, United Kingdom,
Phone: +44 (0)20 7040 8500
Web page: http://www.city.ac.uk
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Jinill Kim and Sunghyun Henry Kim, 2001. "Spurious Welfare Reversals in International Business Cycle Models," Computing in Economics and Finance 2001 3, Society for Computational Economics.
  2. Ben-Gad, Michael, 2004. "The economic effects of immigration--a dynamic analysis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(9), pages 1825-1845, July.
  3. Michael Ben-Gad, 2008. "Capital-Skill Complementarity and the Immigration Surplus," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(2), pages 335-365, April.
  4. Judd, Kenneth L., 1982. "An alternative to steady-state comparisons in perfect foresight models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 10(1-2), pages 55-59.
  5. Kenneth L. Judd, 1998. "Numerical Methods in Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262100711, December.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cty:dpaper:08/07. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Research Publications Librarian).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.