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Cycle commuting in Belgium: Spatial determinants and ‘re-cycling’ strategies

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Author Info

  • VANDENBULCKE, Grégory

    ()
    (Université catholique de Louvain, CORE and Department of Geography, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)

  • DUJARDIN, Claire

    ()
    (Université catholique de Louvain, CORE and FRS-FNRS, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)

  • THOMAS, Isabelle

    ()
    (Université catholique de Louvain, CORE and FRS-FNRS, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)

  • DE GEUS, Bas

    ()
    (Department of Human Psychology and Sports Medicine, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium)

Abstract

This paper attempts to explain the spatial variation of the use of a bicycle for commuting to work at the level of the 589 municipalities in Belgium. Regression techniques were used and special attention was paid to autocorrelation, heterogeneity and multicollinearity. Spatial lag models were used to correct for the presence of spatial dependence and a disaggregated modelling strategy was adopted for the northern and southern parts of the country. The results show that much of the inter-municipality variation in bicycle use is related to environmental aspects such as the relief, traffic volumes and cycling accidents. Town size, distance travelled and demographic aspects also have some effect. In addition, there are regional differences in the effects of the structural covariates on bicycle use: the impact of variables such as traffic volume and cycling accidents differs substantially between the north and the south of the country. This paper also suggests that high rates of bicycle use in one municipality stimulate cycling in neighbouring municipalities, and hence that a mass effect can be initiated, i.e. more cycle commuting encourages even more commuters in the area to cycle. These findings provide some recommendations for decision-makers wishing to promote a shift from car to bicycle use

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE) in its series CORE Discussion Papers with number 2009073.

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Date of creation: 01 Nov 2009
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Handle: RePEc:cor:louvco:2009073

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Postal: Voie du Roman Pays 34, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)
Phone: 32(10)474321
Fax: +32 10474304
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Web page: http://www.uclouvain.be/core
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Keywords: cycling; commuting; spatial lag model; spatial regime; pro-cycling strategies;

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References

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  1. Hopkinson, P & Wardman, M, 1996. "Evaluating the demand for new cycle facilities," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 241-249, October.
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  6. Ramajo, Julián & Márquez, Miguel A. & Hewings, Geoffrey J.D. & Salinas, María M., 2008. "Spatial heterogeneity and interregional spillovers in the European Union: Do cohesion policies encourage convergence across regions?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 551-567, April.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Ralph Buehler & John Pucher, 2012. "Cycling to work in 90 large American cities: new evidence on the role of bike paths and lanes," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 409-432, March.
  2. Thomas Götschi & Beat Hintermann, 2013. "Valuation of public investment to support bicycling (FV-09)," Working papers 2013/02, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
  3. Van Malderen, Laurent & Jourquin, Bart & Pecheux, Claude & Thomas, Isabelle & Van De Vijver, Elien & Vanoutrive, Thomas & Verhetsel, Ann & Witlox, Frank, 2013. "Exploring the profession of mobility manager in Belgium and their impact on commuting," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 46-55.
  4. Cheng, Yung-Hsiang & Liu, Kuo-Chu, 2012. "Evaluating bicycle-transit users’ perceptions of intermodal inconvenience," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(10), pages 1690-1706.
  5. Pucher, John & Buehler, Ralph & Seinen, Mark, 2011. "Bicycling renaissance in North America? An update and re-appraisal of cycling trends and policies," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(6), pages 451-475, July.
  6. Caulfield, Brian, 2014. "Re-cycling a city – Examining the growth of cycling in Dublin," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 216-226.
  7. Laurent Van Malderen & Bart Jourquin & Isabelle Thomas, 2012. "Employers Transport Plans: Do They Change The Commuting Behaviour Of Workers?," ERSA conference papers ersa12p1048, European Regional Science Association.

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