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Financial Incentives to Work - Conceptions and Results in Great Britain, Ireland and Canada

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  • Wolfgang Ochel

Abstract

Some English speaking countries provide employment-conditional tax credits and benefits with a view to increasing employment and improving family income in the low wage brackets. This article deals with Great Britain's Working Families' Tax Credit, Ireland's Back to Work Allowance and her Family Income Supplement, as well as Canadas Child Tax Benefit and her Self-sufficiency Project. It analyses the effects of these programmes and examines whether they can be transplanted to continental European countries.

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File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/DocBase_Content/WP/WP-CESifo_Working_Papers/wp-cesifo-2001/wp-cesifo-2001-12/cesifo_wp627.pdf
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Paper provided by CESifo Group Munich in its series CESifo Working Paper Series with number 627.

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Date of creation: 2001
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Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_627

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  1. Mike Brewer & Paul Gregg, 2002. "Eradicating Child Poverty in Britain: Welfare Reform and Children Since 1997," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK 02/052, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  2. Blundell, Richard, 2000. "Work Incentives and 'In-Work' Benefit Reforms: A Review," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(1), pages 27-44, Spring.
  3. Duncan, Alan & Giles, Christopher, 1996. "Labour Supply Incentives and Recent Family Credit Reforms," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(434), pages 142-55, January.
  4. Wolfgang Ochel, 2000. "Steuergutschriften und Transfers an Arbeitnehmer im Niedriglohnbereich - der angelsächsische Weg zu mehr Beschäftigung und weniger Armut," Ifo Schnelldienst, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 53(21), pages 13-23, 07.
  5. Richard Blundell & Alan Duncan & Julian McCrae & Costas Meghir, 2000. "The labour market impact of the working families’ tax credit," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 21(1), pages 75-103, March.
  6. Mike Brewer, 2000. "Comparing in-work benefits and financial work incentives for low-income families in the US and the UK," IFS Working Papers, Institute for Fiscal Studies W00/16, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  7. Callan, Tim & O'Neill, Ciarán J. & O'Donoghue, Cathal, 1995. "Supplementing Family Income," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number PRS23.
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Cited by:
  1. Olivier Bargain & Karina Doorley, 2009. "In-work Transfers in Good Times and Bad - Simulations for Ireland," Working Papers, School Of Economics, University College Dublin 200930, School Of Economics, University College Dublin.
  2. Wolfgang Ochel, 2003. "Welfare to Work in the United Kingdom," CESifo DICE Report, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 1(2), pages 56-62, 02.

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